How to change lens w/ minimum dust?

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by f_k|2, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. I've got 2 lenses, standard zoom and telephoto zoom. I've got one
    body, the Rebel XT. I'm going to be going to a beach resort, so I
    think I'll be taking a variety of pictures. Is it safe if I change
    lens whenever I want, but just do it quickly? Do people do that alot?
    Is there a better way? Thanks
     
  2. A beach is not the best environment to switch lenses...
    flip your camera (lens down) before making the switch.
     
  3. The beach, eh? :)
    Here's how I minimize exposure of the camera's internals while changing lenses:
    1. I release the lens on the camera and turn it partially.
    2. I remove the rear lens cap from the lens I'm about to attach.
    3. I complete the removal of the attached lens and quickly move the other lens into position and attach it.
    4. I attach the rear lens cap to the lens I just removed.
    I prefer to do this with the camera on the tripod. If possible, I swap lenses before going out into "the environment" - i.e., the beach.
    In general I try to minimize lens changes. No matter what you do there will eventually be stuff on the sensor, so go ahead and get the equipment needed to clean in and learn how to use it - and learn how to use Photoshop to deal with the inevitable dust bunnies.
     
  4. The last guy said it all,
    If you get dust, Canon will do a one time no fee sensor cleaning. That's only for the sensor though. I got dust somewhere I couldn't reach myself, but not on the sensor, and Canon wants the standard $180 service fee to clean 1 speck of dust that has plagued my photos for 2 years on a 10D. But the last guy said the magic word...."Photoshop". Good luck with that.

    Mike
     
  5. ky2

    ky2

    Last time I checked, there's more dust in my house than on the beach.
     
  6. "Last time I checked, there's more dust in my house than on the beach."
    No doubt you are right - but sand inside any mechanical device will shorten its lifetime considerably. Dust is inconvenient, but sand is abrasive!
     
  7. Sand doesn't tend to fly around that much, except if it is blowing hard. Dust is everywhere and is invisible. I would not worry too much about changing lenses at the beach. I do it all the time. Just use common sense.
     
  8. I use a system similar to the one described to change lenses quickly. To make sure it is quick, I usually hold the rear lens cap in my teeth while doing the switch. Then I can slap it back on quickly. If I don't have the camera on a tripod, I use the neck strap to support it. This does minimize my ability to point the "open" camera in the safest possible direction, though. I can face things vertically, but can't really hold the camera down as described.

    One beach hazard besides sand is salt spray.
     
  9. My experience as an Eos 1 D's mark 2 is change lens when you can, don't change them outdoors, indoors is much less propensive to get dust in the chamber.
    Whoa buddy don't chanage lens in the beach, just change it indoors, wind, small particle of sand, humid salty air, hmmmmm, Lets put it this way, I had use Canon for 10 years now, all 1 series camera, when I changed to the 1ds mark 2, I just leave the lens attach to the camera, and change it very few times.
    Cmos seems to be very propensive to dust, believe me, I have a dust problems too, Canon has to come up with a cleaning kit or something, I am very disappointed in Canon on their behalf for this problem.
     
  10. I'm not sure of the truth of this, but I read somewhere that it is a good idea to turn the camera off before changing lenses. Something about the powered sensor attracting more dust.

    A.
     
  11. Keep lens and housing openings downwards. Don't leave a lens standing up with the rear cap removed. Dust will of course blow around, but it isn't easy to blow anything into a cavity with only one opening, so much of the dirt in your lens and housing is brought there by gravity.

    Try standing in the sun and bend over and change lenses etc. and watch a lot of particles from your clothes, hair etc.

    make it a habit to blow the lens and housing out frequently with a rubber blower.

    If you want the picture, you have to change lenses here and now, even if you risc getting dust into it.

    I have my camera in a bag on the back of my bicycle when touring. Last time I somehow smashed a filter on my 17-40 and the attached hood on my 50mm 1.8 tore the ring off it was attached to but I could just click it back again.

    Your equipment isn't worth anything if you don't use it.
     
  12. I'm not sure of the truth of this, but I read somewhere that it is a good idea to turn the camera off before changing lenses. Something about the powered sensor attracting more dust.

    It's an urban legend. It'd have to suck dust THROUGH the mirror, and the shutter as well. Even if both were removed it'd need hundreds of times the single-digit voltages on a CMOS to do anything. Even CRTs, using 50kV or more, attract dust very slowly, and only when it naturally comes quite close to them.
     
  13. I also have always believed it to be a good idea to power the camera down before changing lenses, I hesitate to seperate the electrical contacts between lens and body while there is current passing between them. Perhaps someone could comment on whether or not this is neccessary, but it's one of those things that just seem like a good idea and can't hurt.
     
  14. Agreed: power off for that reason. The sensor being charged may also be true: there is dust in the air around the sensor, and a sensor that is on could be electrostatically attracting the dust that swirls around it. I don't see why not. And when open., there is more air, and hence more dust around.
     
  15. My sensor was absolutely filthy - brand new! I took it to a local shop (extremely well-respected) and they walked me through cleaning it, and gave me tips on keeping it that way - with the caveat that dust WILL get in, because that's what dust does.
    1) turn the camera off before removing the lens (or memory card)because "electrostatic build-up will attract dust" in the case of the sensor, and might cause you to corrupt data in regards to the card.
    2) Change lenses with the camera lens opening facing the ground.
    3) When you do have to blow the sensor off - DO NOT use canned air EVER! Use a bulb blower (Giottos) with the lens opening facing the ground - gravity is your friend! If you do it facing up (as the manual recommends) you will just blow the dust around, not out - which is exactly my experience.
    4) If the sensor is still dirty and a blower won't get it, use Eclipse fluid and Sensor Swabs.
    But - whatever you do, get used to the idea that the sensor WILL get dirty and you're going to have to blow/clean it, or wind up spending more time cloning dust out than taking pictures.
     
  16. I hesitate to seperate the electrical contacts between lens and body while there is current passing between them.
    I don't believe that there's any appreciable current unless the lens is autofocusing or image stabilizing. With respect to dust, I believe that you'll pump more dust in and out with a lens that extends than you will changing it.
     
  17. The first thing I purchased in preparation for my upcoming DSLR purchase is a sensor
    cleaning kit. I am ready for the inevitable out-of-box experience.
     
  18. "turn the camera off before removing the lens (or memory card)because "electrostatic build-up will attract dust" in the case of the sensor..."
    Kathy, surely you would then need to wait 30 minutes or so for the static charge to dissipate - merely turning off the power will not 'earth' away any static charge build-up? I'd be very surprised if you reduce the dust problem by turning off the camera each time you change lenses.
     
  19. A photographer that I met said that he keeps a 1.4X converter on ALWAYS. Then when changing lenses the camera back is never exposed to the environment.
     
  20. Guess he doesn't do any closeup work, huh? ;-) In any case, dust can collect on the converter just as easily as the sensor/IR filter. Might be a little easier to clean, but the depreciation in image quality (not to mention the added magnification factor) of a 1.4x TC outweigh the convenience factor for many, if not most photographers.
     
  21. Use the bathroom! Seriously! The bathroom in the home is likely to have the least amount of dust because there is usually no soft furniture, bedding, curtains etc. These items collect and disperse dust easily. Also, you can run the shower for a few minutes to increase the humidity. Humidity keeps the dust down. Public restrooms are also places with low dust if they are subject to a regular cleaning schedule.
     

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