High definition film development

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by waltonwhittaker, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. Here is my project: to come up with a highly defined print using the best black and white film/developer
    combination. I need to find a photo lab in the US that can give me that kind of development-- perhaps using
    DiXactol on a low-ISO black and white film. What recommendation can you make for a lab that does that kind of
    work? Most limit you to D-76 and that won't work on this kind of project. If you are familiar with Barry
    Thornton's work--that is the kind of print I am aiming for. FYI-- I am an experienced b&w photographer with four
    decades of experience in photojournalism and have developed most of my own prints. I am looking for a lab that
    can handle this particular project. Thanks.
     
  2. RICHARDS PHOTO LAB LOS ANGELS
    323 939-8893
     
  3. SCL

    SCL

    Contact Gamma Labs in Chicago --- for decades they have catered to the professional fashion photographer trade...perhaps they can do it. www.gammaimaging.com
     
  4. A few possibilities, tho' you'll need to contact them directly for availability and details:

    http://jaygaffney.com/

    http://www.alexisneel.com/

    http://www.dr5.com/
     
  5. You don't say how large your print needs to be or what format you want to shoot. If you just need a print of a certain size then using a medium format or large format camera will be the easiest way to get there. If you are shooting with 35mm equipment then you can use a document type film like Kodak Imagelink HQ film along with a low contrast developer. With the right lens and a film like Imagelink you can certainly keep fine detail in a fairly large print. The problem is that the EI will be very low so this kind of combination is only good for very slow moving or non-moving subjects.
     
  6. Rollie ATP 1.1 works for 35mm. DR5 will do the developing.
     
  7. Barry Thornton prescribed higher iso films eg 400 for perceived acutance. he compared panf 50 to a 400 speed film ( i assume it was hp5 ) in a side by side comparison. if you look at the info attached to some of his images you'll see mostly 400 speed films. hope this helps.
     
  8. http://www.mvlabs.com
     

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