HELP ABOUT D5000 / D90

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by charles_cerdenia, Jun 18, 2010.

  1. hi, i'm near on buying my first SLR camera and i've come to this final two options. oh well make it three (for the budget. haha),
    i'm thinking of what to pick with this three nikon slrs.
    NIKON D3000
    NIKON D5000
    NIKON D90
    yes, ive read reviews and forums and they would all say go for the d90. but i want to clear some things. first of all, what i want for my first slr is the one that is good for
    ACTION SHOTS - (like taking photos from a basketball game, baseball game, etc)
    GOOD FOR TRAVELING
    AND LASTLY GOOD FOR FAMILY SHOTS.
    i really want a slr that COULD GET GOOD QUALITY ACTION SHOTS/PICTURES
    oh well my budget is below $1000 and D90 is way too over the limit. so pls do give me a good advice. thanks :)
     
  2. Sorry, but you not going to want to hear that the auto focus module on the D90 is superior to the other two bodies - will do sports action better. Essentially one pays for what one gets.
    All three bodies will suit for travel and family photos.
     
  3. Oops,my error - the D5000 and D90 appear to share the same auto focus unit........ I do appologise for jump starting......
     
  4. thanks for the response matthew. so can D5000 give me good action shots?
     
  5. Honestly, for action shots the best option is an used D300 which has a much better AF module. For a budget oriented solution, either D90 and D5000 can serve you quite well. You have to to notice that the difference in cost between the two involves some important things, like (but not only):
    - D5000 does not have motor focus so it will work (auto-focus) only with modern AF-S lenses while D90 can AF with older AF or AF-D glass that in general is less expensive;
    -D90 includes the great Nikon CLS capability to command external speedlights
    -D90 has a better viewfinder, a higher resolution display, a top secondary display and some more controls on the body
    Despite these differences, D5000 has the advantage to be a little bit smaller, has a movable display that can be very good in certain aplications and can deliver great pictures if you do not need the extra facilities of D90. In general D5000 is a perfect travel & street companion, I have one and I enjoy using it... but is not my main camera.
    Make sure to budget for glass too. For travel & family you can use very well the kit lens... but if you want sport and action you need fast & long...
     
  6. For what you want to do, all 3 bodies are fine. The D5000/D90 have a better sensor, but the D3000 isn't bad by any stretch of imagination. The D90 certainly is the best featured of the 3, but whether it's worth busting your budget is really something for yourself to decide.
    Any DSLR can get a good action shot. Sure higher end gear like the D300 have more bells and whistles to get that done, but it can really be done with any DSLR.
    LIke Mihai says, think about the lens too. To get started, I would suggest opting for the 18-105VR rather than the 18-55VR, it's a nice versatile range and a generally good lens (but a bit more costly).
     
  7. So, to be more precise than my previous post: I would consider D5000 with 18-105VR, and for the sports start saving up for a 70-300VR later.
     
  8. After a similar discussion this week I'm compelled to offer that you MUST be sure you're never going to want to buy a non AF-S lens if you buy the D5000. imho, the lack of a screwdrive AF motor hampers that camera enough that I recommend that all avoid it, on that basis alone.
    If you are serious enough to get an inter-changeable lens camera, you are probably serious enough that you don't want to be limited later in what lens you can purchase.
     
  9. Bottom line on the D5000. Yes, you can get excellent action shots especially if you're using a good AF lense with it like the 70-300mm VR. The D90 has many advantages with regard to easier, quicker setting of aperture, ISO, burst mode, metering mode etc., but once all of your parameters are set the D5K gives great actions shots. Go for it and maybe upgrade to a D90 or D300s (or their replacements) sometime in the future. I sold my D5K and bought the D90 and love it, but I also did much more than just point & shoot with the D5K.
     
  10. D5000 and a sigma 50-150mm f/2.8 for sports (and travel, too); and get the kit 18-55mm (or the 35mm f/1.8) for travel --- that's maybe going a little over $1000.
     
  11. If you want to do field sports on a budget and get excellent results it really comes down to lens selection. The best budget lens choices for sports will only work on bodies with an internal focus motor like the D90.
    I recommend starting with the D90 and the 18-105 VR lens. When you can afford a starting sports lens go to keh.com and look for a used Nikon 180/2.8 ED AF or used Nikon 80-200/2.8 ED AF push pull lens, either available for under $500 and neither will work on less than D90. You don't need VR for sports since you need a fast shutter speed anyway and the image quality of the f2.8 lenses is vastly superior to the f5.6 VR lenses. You will have the 18-105 VR when you absolutely can't get the image without VR. I recommend a push pull zoom for sports since I just bought the 80-200/2.8 AF-S lens and the rotating ring for zoom is a pain although the AF-S is superfast. Another good budget sports lens is the Nikon 300/4 AF (again won't work on lesser cameras than the D90).
     
  12. double post
     
  13. "so can D5000 give me good action shots"
    A camera does not give good action shots - a photographer takes good action shots. And a good photographer can get good/great action shots regardless of the camera he/she uses. While a better AF system makes it easier, You don't have to spend thousands of dollars to get great shots. I get great action shots with my D40.
    All Nikon DSLR cameras give great results. The differences for the most part are in their controls and features (and IQ at higher ISO for some models). My advise. Buy you lenses first. Then get the most camera you can with the money you have left.
    This shot below was taken with an older Nikon P&S:
    00WhcC-253011584.jpg
     
  14. A D90 can power the autofocus on a lens like the AF 85mm 1.8 D. A D5000 can't. That 85 makes a very nice indoor sports/theater lens.
     
  15. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Elliot, you have done it again. Last time you posted that same image and claimed that it was captured with a point-and-shoot, I asked you why the EXIF data show a Nikon D70: http://www.photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00V6P0
    And you pick an "action" image where the subject's feet were not exactly moving. That is quite different from basketball and baseball the OP has in mind.
    Among all current Nikon DSLRs, Nikon only uses two AF systems: the D3000, D5000, and D90 all use the Multi-CAM 1000 that has 11 AF points. From the D300S (and the discontinued D300) and above, including the D700 and everything in the D3 family, they use the Multi-CAM 3500
    You can get some (occasional) good sports images with any camera, includng point and shoot and cellphone cameras, as shown in the thread I linked to above. Today, serious sports/action photographers use cameras with the Multi-CAM 3500 AF module or Canon equivalent. A high-end camera does not guarantee good results, but in the right hands, one can get a much much higher percentage of excellent action images.
    Of course not everybody needs or can afford a high-end sports camera. Between the D90 and D5000, you'll unlikely see a whole lot of differences in terms of AF speed.
    The D90 and D5000 are about equal for travel and family images. The D90 will give you more controls and controls that are easier to access. The D90 can AF with older AF lenses that have no AF motor inside; the D5000 cannot. If you are a more casual photographer, the D5000 should be just fine. I kind of like it swivel screen.
     
  16. this is a tricky one because the d5000 is great for entry-level users. it has a lot going for it, namely the swivel screen and excellent low-light performance. but if you want to use it with more than kit lenses, or you want to use it with fast primes, older lenses, or many 3rd party lenses, all of a sudden it becomes limited in glass selection and/or the cost of lenses becomes prohibitive. that said, it seems like the d90 is out of your budget. so, i would get the d5000 with the caveat that you should do some research on lenses, as the d5000 will only auto-focus with lenses with built-in motors. i beleive the d5000 comes witht he 18-55 VR as a kit. that will be ok for travel and family shots. for daytime sports, the 55-200 VR should be okay but not great, the 70-300 VR a little better, and the 50-150/2.8 HSM even better, plus good for nightime sports and portraits which isolate the main subject. but that lens is pricier than the camera, so that might be one to get later on.
    basically, you are buying an entry-level camera with a limited budget. if you adjust your expectations accordingly, you should be satisfied. learn as much as you can about photographic tips and techniques, and maybe invest in classes before you buy a whole lot of new gear.
     
  17. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    The 18-55mm kit lens is merely one of the options for the D5000. You can always buy the D5000 by itself and add whatever lens that you find appropriate.
    The D3000 is a different story. At least in the US, a new D3000 always comes with the 18-55mm zoom as a kit; body only is not an option. Unless you buy it used as body only or buy the kit and resell the lens, you are kind of stuck with the 18-55.
     
  18. Correction to my above post and photo: While I was certain the shot above was taken as I indicated, the EXIF data cannot be wrong and I thank Shun for bringing that to my attention. While I had taken thousands of action photos at that venue on different occasions over a period of two years (around 2003/2004) with my 8700, I had at some point upgraded to the D70 - this shot must have been taken after I sold my 8700. I must be getting Alzheimers! I apologize for my error.
     
  19. This shot was taken at the same venue, same person, 4 months prior to the brick break photo, shot with the 8700. Again, sorry for my confusion.
    00Whm9-253105684.jpg
     
  20. This was taken with a D5000 and a 55-200mm lens. (And Eric makes some good points).
    00WhqD-253140284.jpg
     
  21. I also have an example using Panning Technique: (btw I'd suggest the D5000 over the D3000 if you can't afford the D90)
    00WhqP-253143584.jpg
     
  22. I have the D5000 and have used it successfully with action shots - but it has taken a lot of research and practice. (I expect that would be true of any camera, though obviously the higher-end cameras give you a better start.) When I bought it, I loved the size and I only expected to use it for the usual family pictures, vacation travel, etc. It has turned out to be an excellent camera for me. With the D5000, I have the pictures I've been craving for years.
    But, I have already spent more on the two AF-S lenses that I needed for gymnastics meets than I would have on the upgrade to the D90. The better the lens, the happier you will be with results, but if you do your homework, you can accomplish a lot with the D5000 and a basic lens.
    Having discovered that I love photography even more than I remembered, and that my son has a great eye for composition, my plan is to upgrade to the 300s (or whatever is current) as soon as possible and pass the D5000 on to my son. It will probably be another year or so, and the D5000 will be more than sufficient in the meantime.
    One other thing you need to think about before buying a camera -- if you plan to shoot with a high ISO (such as indoors for basketball), and depending on your expectations, you will need software to clean up the noise. (I can't remember if the software that comes with the camera handles that, but I don't think it does.) You might want to consider that as you tally costs.
     
  23. I checked Adorama and found these prices (rounded to nearest whole dollar) that fit in your budget:
    D5000 body only $597
    Nikon 18-105VR $360 new, $300 white box, $240 refurbished by Nikon. White box is a new lens fully warranteed by Nikon that came out of a kit. Refurbished is also a good way to save money. The lens is refurbished by Nikon and warranteed by Nikon for 90 days.
    I think that the D5000 is a much better camera than the D3000 and the 18-105 VR is a better lens with a more useful focal length range than the 18-55. Also the D3000 only comes in a kit with the 18-55. You see the action pictures taken with a D5000 so you know what it can do.
     
  24. Charles,
    I was in your shoes somewhere around March this year. Price was a very big deciding factor for me but I knew I wanted to get a bit more serious with my photography so my mind was set on the D90. My biggest hesitation was of course the price. I eventually found a seller on ebay selling it brand new (in box and full warranty) for around USD755 (body only). I bought the 50mm f/1.8 lens seperate from J&R electronics for USD124. All in all a pretty good deal.
     
  25. Hi, I'm new, and I am looking for the same answer...I am considering a D5000 but I want to be able to take gymnastics photos. I can't find any examples like that anywhere, just theoretical talk about whether it might be fast enough. There is a Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 lens for about $800, which does have the focusing motor, so it will work on the D5000...BUT I wonder if it is enough to capture the action.
    Those action shots posted above were taken with flash or outdoors...HUGE difference from an indoor gym. I'd like to see some shots taken with the D5000 in a gym. Even at f2.8 and ISO3200, you're talking possible shutter speeds in the range of 1/125 (depending on the gym's lighting), which isn't that great...and 50mm isn't long enough if you can't get under the basket (which is the case for gymnastics, unless you have permission to be on the floor with the team, you are pretty far away).
     
  26. L Schin,
    PLEASE try to afford a D90 if you can. You will very likely be sorry, eventually, that you didn't get the model with the screwdrive motor. There have been and might still be some good refurb deals on D90s.
     
  27. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Peter, exactly which "screwdirver" (i.e. AF but not AF-S) lenses do you have in mind?
    I would say for the typical D5000 and D3000 owners, they will buy no more than 2, 3 lenses. There are currently many DX lenses from Nikon and other brands to meet their needs. All but one Nikon DX lenses are AF-S (the only exception is the 10.5mm/f2.8 DX fisheye). Choose among these and you are all set:
    • 18-55mm/f3.5-5.6 DX, VR or non VR
    • 18-105mm
    • 55-200, any version
    • 70-300
    • 35mm/f1.8 DX
    The only common lenses I can think of are the 50mm/f1.8 AF-D and perhaps some of the Tokina wide zooms such as the old version of the Tokina 12-24mm/f4 (the new, 2nd version has an AF motor in the lens) and the 11-16mm/f2.8. If you have plans to get one of those lenses, you are better off with the D90.
    However, the D90 has many other advantages such as two command dials, flash FP sync, the pop-up flash can be CLS commander, a larger and better LCD, etc.
     
  28. Shun,
    How many times in even just the past 2 or 3 months have we seen somebody looking for primes for their D5000 and finding they have to MF everything they are considering or can find used. The problem with the D5000 is that people see that the image quality is the same as the D90, and thus assume it's just as useful. Then they want to buy serious lenses, like an 85 or a 105 DC or something like that.
    As a step up from the D3000 for the guy that is going to be happy with the kit lens and one tele zoom, it's a great camera, but as a "poor man's D90" it is a bad idea. And the other advantages you list are a big deal, too. imho, it's worth the extra money for the screwdrive motor alone, and the other stuff is a bonus (although the much better flash capability is big, too, I don't use it as much as that screwdriver).
     
  29. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Perhaps I missed it, but I am not aware that many D5000 owners want 85mm and 105mm lenses. Those are fine portrait lenses for FX; on DX, they are too long for portrait, especially the 105mm.
     
  30. I just threw those out there, what happens is that people come on here (I don't have time to look up the threads now) and say, I got a D5000 and want to buy a lens for xxxx. And the next thing you know, half the available solutions are unworkable because they bought the wrong camera for somebody who wants to build up a lens collection. Now... I think they didn't KNOW that they were that kind of person yet when they bought the camera. Which is why, imho, if you're serious enough to want what the D5000 offers over the D3000, I think you should seriously skip it and go to the D90, because you may find out you're even more serious than you think.
    Also, my 105mm is my favorite lens now for outdoor portraits, even on DX. But indoors, yes, you're right.
     
  31. L. Schin: I have the D5000 and the Sigma 70-200 lens and I have used it for gymnastics. Yes, it does work, with some practice. I think that practice is probably critical for gymnastics photos on any camera, especially with the higher levels.
    I also agree that there are better camera choices and I have found myself spending more for AF-S lenses. I suspect I am one of those people discussed above :) who bought the D5000 and then found myself obsessed with my camera and wanting more. However, the local camera store assures me that there is no reason to upgrade (yet) and that my D5000 with an investment in a few good lenses offers plenty of opportunity. (I was in there again yesterday and they repeated the same advice.) I wish I had bought the D90 but I didn't. I'm not going to beat myself up over it. You work with what you have.
    I'm not comfortable posting gymnastics pictures here, since almost all of them include a child who is not my own. Most of my best pictures are at ISO 1600-2000 (or below), f/2.8 and 1/320s. Beyond ISO 2000, there is significant (to me) noise. Our gym is fairly bright, but I have been able to get good photos at the same aperture/shutter speed at a much darker gym. Then I lightened the photos a slight bit in Lightroom 3.
     
  32. Thank you for your response...I understand your concern about posting the photos. Perhaps that's why I'm not finding any other examples, either. If the camera store guys are saying the D5000 is fine, and you are getting good photos out of it, why do you wish you had gotten the D90?
    As for not being able to get prime lenses for it (or, spending more for them, at least)...I owned an Olympus OM-2N so I am not completely new to photography, though it has been quite a few years since I used that kind of camera. However, I really do not anticipate investing even more money into glass, at least not any time soon...and if 10 years goes by, so many things will have changed by then that I probably will want a new camera anyway! LOL I plan on getting the kit lenses and the Sigma for gymnastics, and that will be it. So that is not enough of a reason for me to get the D90.
    In addition, the D90 is sooooo heavy, and even though it does have other advantages, there are some disadvantages as well--such as ease of use with the scene modes and the articulating screen on the D5000--not deal breakers but nice features for a P&S convert :)
    What I am really looking for is whether the D5000 is fast enough for indoor sports like gymnastics. I'd love to see examples, because otherwise we may not be speaking the same language as to what looks good.
     
  33. My time is going to be limited the next few days (and I may not be back on photo.net), but let me try to reply with more detailed information.
    I purchased the D5000 after borrowing my Dad's D60. I hadn't planned on spending more than $500 for a new camera, but fell in love with the D60. The D5000 seemed a good compromise. The size is perfect for me, and I like the swivel screen. (I hardly ever use it - the focus is too slow for anything that is moving - but I do use it occasionally.) Also, I never use the scene modes; occasionally I'll set it on auto so my husband can take a picture of me. The best thing is that I am getting the pictures of my children that I've always wanted.
    The main reason I wish I had bought the D90 is that I could have purchased older, used lenses. Right now I think the D90 would, in the long run, give me more flexibility. (And, frankly, I'm so tired of people telling me that I should have bought the D90.) On the other hand, what I really needed for gymnastics was the D300s, and that wasn't even on my radar! But, of course, I never expected to become the "team photographer" when I bought the camera.
    In my opinion, the D5000 + the Sigma is definitely fast enough for the lower levels of gymnastics, but that depends on what you are wanting to capture. The camera + the Sigma lens got some great pictures of our lower level gymnasts. However, my son competes in Acrobatic Gymnastics, which has a different set of skills than Artistic. In the lower levels (4 - 7) they are more focused on balance skills so it's easy to capture them in their "holds". Overall, they don't move very fast across the floor.
    We also have one elite pair and I got a few nice shots of them, with little to no motion blur. They were much harder to capture because they move so quickly around and *above* the floor, and a camera with a better continuous shooting rate (like the D300s) would have been much better for them. Also, I think I would have had more "keepers" if I had been able to shoot them at 1/500s (and I could have done that with a better ISO). But, as it was, I had enough pictures for our coach to use for some publicity. I think that with some practice I can improve next year.
    Keep in mind that when the camera store tells me the D5000 is sufficient, they know that I am not a professional and not being paid for my gymnastics pictures. They sell a lot of the Sigma lenses to parents with student athletes and that's how they see me. If I were to ask them to compare the D5000 to the D90 for *my purposes*, I think they would say that the two are comparable.
    One more thing: one of the reasons I'm not sure you would get the full measure of the quality of the D5000 + the Sigma lens from my pictures is that I am still very inexperienced at it. When I see my pictures, I see things that I know could be better. A better camera/lens would probably get me there faster, but I think I can improve my technique and get more out of the D5000 than I did this past year.
     
  34. L. Schin: Have you considered asking for examples on the Flickr D5000 group? Even if there were no gymnastics photos, perhaps someone would have examples from another indoor sport, like basketball.
     
  35. Lisa, you have been a HUGE help!! No one ever described all of that to me before, and you really hit the nail on the head with the issues, I think! I never thought about the gymnasts moving faster as they went up in levels LOL I hadn't heard of the flickr group so I will look for that, thank you!
    You mentioned wishing you could get 1/500...if you are unable to get that, then I think it would indeed be very hard to get good shots. I am obviously an amateur as well, so my shots will probably be worse than yours. So that leads me to the question as to whether I should just drop the whole idea of getting gymnastics photos (to the tune of an additional $800 min for the lens) if they are just going to be so-so.
    One last question, when you get a chance: Do you think the prime lenses such as 85mm f1.8 would work for gymnastics? Better aperture, but now you've only got 85 mm and no ability to zoom out for the closer stations. So, I'm thinking it would not work but on other forums people keep bringing them up, so that's why I am asking.
    Thank you ever so much, you're just what I needed
     
  36. I'm glad I've helped. I got a lot of help from the guys in the Sports forum before and immediately after I bought the Sigma lens. I'm glad I can pass on the knowledge I've gained to someone else.
    I need to think a bit about the best lens. The best thing about the DX cameras - for me - is the extra reach. At most meets, I would have done fine with 85-105mm. But at one of the gyms I definitely needed the 200. If you can get close to the athletes then the 85 would probably be great. At Acro meets, this isn't too difficult because they only use the floor and there is usually only one of those. At Artistic meets, I would think you would be farther away for some of the apparatuses. (Is that the plural of apparatus? No one has ever told me!)
    I guess one of the tricky things about the zoom - again, this is more true for the elite athletes - is that they move so fast it was hard for me to follow them, autofocus (I need to perfect this, I find myself hesitating), and then zoom when I needed to. It was a lot to juggle! And the Sigma lens is heavy so I was always aware of the weight.
    Whether you decide you want to try to shoot gymnastics depends, I guess, on how driven you are to do it! Sometimes we have professional photographers at meets, sometimes we don't. Sometimes the pros are VERY expensive. And I happen to like capturing motion - it's one of my favorite things to do. I use the Sigma for other things, too.
    Let me think more about this, and see if I can add anything. I'll try to get back to you tomorrow.
     
  37. Thanks, Lisa! Have you actually tried carrying around the D90? I think it's very heavy, and with the added lens it could be over the top LOL
    We never have pro photographers. If we DID, I probably would just buy the pictures instead of spending $2000 on equipment and learning to take halfway decent (not pro) shots! Though I do love photography, so it's a good excuse, too :)
     
  38. Have you fine folks who say a D90 is too big and heavy held both a D5000 and a D90? Sorry, but if the D90 is too big and heavy for you, just consider a micro 4/3 or P&S camera. The difference is incidental, and if a D90 is too heavy for you, so is a D5000.
    D90 is 1 lb. 6 oz.
    D5000 is a little over 2 oz. lighter... You're complaining about 2 ounces?
     
  39. well Pete that's not a very helpful response, I have to say. The other cameras will not do gymnastics. And what you are calling a couple ounces makes a difference if you are carrying a camera around on vacation all day. It may not affect you, but the D5000 was plenty heavy as it is, adding more to the weight (and bulk) may put me into the "I don't even want to bother with this" camp
     
  40. I have a picture for you. I was photographing my son's team at Nationals training today and these girls were on the same floor. I'm on my husband's laptop, so I haven't done anything to it and couldn't resize it. I think these girls (a "trio" in acro terms) are probably Level 8.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/41473201@N07/4822268966/
    Also, I was able to get a sense about whether the 85mm would work. I think that, if you don't know whether or not you are going to be able to close, you would be happier with the 70-200mm. I was up in the stands, maybe 25? yards from these girls, who were at the closest part of the floor to me. I took this at 120mm, 1/250s, f2.8, ISO 1400. (Hope I got that right.) I needed the 200 to get reasonably close to our team on the far side of the mat. I think I have a couple of photos at 1/400s. If I find them, I'll add one to the Flickr site.
     
  41. Wow, I can understand not wanting extra weight (like a D300 or D3)... but please find something that's 2 oz. and pick it up and tell me that it'll make any difference... Don't make this the deciding factor. I mean, I defy you to feel the difference between a D90 and D5000's weight with an 85mm f1.8 lens attached to either. There is virtually no difference.
    And if you're looking at a 70-200? Then it's REALLY incidental.
     
  42. Oh, one other thing you will need to think about - editing software to correct the color balance and reduce noise, especially if you are going to have to shoot above ISO 1600. I recently purchased Lightroom 3 and it's perfect for this. However, it's pricey and it may not be something you feel like you need right now. Just wanted to make sure you think about that expense, too.
    Just thought of something else. :) The light over this floor was brighter than most of the gyms we shoot in. That's one reason I could post them straight out of the camera.
     
  43. Thanks, Lisa, that's an awesome photo! That's especially good for 1/250! The lighting does make a difference, I know, but it could give me an idea. That does help to know the distance, and I think you are right.
    And Pete, I have tried both the D5000 and the D90 so I know EXACTLY how they feel. The D90 feels like brick, the D5000 feels like a camera. The extra large lens is only going to be for gymnastics, not every day. But this camera with its kit lens will be my only other camera, so I can make an exception for weight when I am not carrying it around all day. I don't really need to hear more of this argument, please :)
     
  44. You know what, Pete, it just occurred to me that the lens on the D90 might have been different from the one on the D5000 in the store...I am seeing that there are different configurations of what they call the "kit," so the one I picked up may have had the longer lens on it. Might explain everything. Going back today!
     
  45. LSchin,
    But I have to say, if the D5000 does feel better in your hands and you don't mind it's very few limitations, then you should go for that. I went Nikon instead of Canon years ago partly because of how it felt in my hand. It's a GREAT reason to make the decision, since all these cameras we're talking about are so great.
     

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