good, fast (200-400) slide films?

Discussion in 'Film and Processing' started by david_blackburn|1, Jun 27, 2003.

  1. any votes for a good, fast (iso 200-400) slide film? i have tried
    provia 400. it was ok. i dont know anything about any other fast
    slide films. i already use slower slide films (velvia 50, provia
    100f, astia), so please dont tell me to just use a slower film.
    also, i cant really push the film (it is for a camera without manual
    film speed settings, just DX), so just high speed films, please.
     
  2. I often use Kodak Ektachrome 200. It has relatively tight grain and decent speed. The colors are neutral based, but not pale. I don't like any 400 speed slide films, as the grain is not acceptable for most applications. This was my primary film for a movie scene I had to recently photograph in a bar, and it handled very well and will be acceptable for their post production needs.
     
  3. Kodak E200 is good, Fuji Provia 400F (a very different animal from the film it
    replaced, Provia 400) is better
     
  4. ted_marcus|1

    ted_marcus|1 Ted R. Marcus

    Another option is to use one of the latest ISO 400 color negative films and send it to Dale Labs to be printed as slides. You'll get slides with better color and finer grain than any ISO 400 slide film (with the possible exception of Fuji Provia 400F), and with much wider exposure latitude. Dale's slides have a color "palette" like any other slide film, and you may or may not like it. I have tried the consumer Elite 200 slide film. The color is underwhelming (with bluish greens) and the grain is coarse. Other than that (for testing camera function) I use only negative film.
     
  5. Unfortunately, negative film tends to scan with relatively coarse grain on sharp scanners. I guess it's just that neg film is designed for analog printing and slide film for reproduction.
     
  6. In my opinion (and according to my experiences) nothing beats Provia 100F pushed one (or even two!) stops. It's definitely better than E200 or Provia 400F (which was quite a disappointment for me, both because of its color and its graininess) (IMHO!!). The biggest surprise for me was how good Provia 100 is pushed to ISO 400, it looked significantly better to me than Provia 400!!
    I wonder how the new Ektachromes will perform pushed.
     
  7. i cant push. but i will remember that for later with the other camera.
     
  8. I've never tried Provia 400F, but I do use Sensia 400 once in a while when I want extra grain and slightly surreal colors for effect. I was told that Sensia 400 is identical to Provia 400, but very different from Provia 400F.

    As for David's dilemma, if it were me I would get an inexpensive camera that lets you set ASA or has a compensation dial. You might even save money over the long run if you find a lab that doesn't charge for pushing.
     
  9. ok, i have a camera that lets me set film speed. but i also have another camera (pocket P&S) that doesnt. i guess i will try 400F again, if that is the best. the grain was acceptable to me, i just didnt like the colors that much. thanks everyone.
     
  10. If you are the David Blackburn who works at JMNHS I'll bring some samples of slides shot with Provia 400F on Thursday.
     
  11. In my opinion (and according to my experiences) nothing beats Provia 100F pushed one (or even two!) stops. It's definitely better than E200 or Provia 400F
    I'll tell you what beats Provia 100 pushed two stops. Provia 400F, that's what.
    Either your eyes are damaged, or your loupe needs cleaning, but 400F beats 100F pushed two stops any day.
    Having 35mm slides made from negs is also absurd. Must be a full moon out tonight.
     
  12. ted_marcus|1

    ted_marcus|1 Ted R. Marcus

    Having 35mm slides made from negs is also absurd. Must be a full moon out tonight.
    Not absurd at all. Besides providing slides for projection, it's a very good way to proof the negatives, far better than the standard 4x6 prints. View the slides on a light box through a magnifier, and you can easily tell which negatives you'll want to enlarge or scan. Slides made from fast negative film have much finer grain than fast slide film, which makes it a very good option if you need a fast film. I can only suggest that you try a roll or two and see how you like the slides.
     
  13. You can push the film by changing the DX code.
    http://www.nelsontan.com/articles/dxcode.html
     
  14. have you considered b&w slide film (Scala is ISO 200/24) ??
     

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