Fujifilm Announces XT2

Discussion in 'Mirrorless Digital Cameras' started by eric_arnold, Jul 6, 2016.

    • (Adorama preorder is here.)
    • (DPR first impressions review is here.)
    That was quick. I wasnt expecting this until Photokina. MSRP at intro is $1600. 24mp, 8fps, 4k video, dual card slots, 1/8000 top shutter speed, new flash controls, flippy screen, 507g weight. Optional grip boosts fps to 11. Weather-sealed. joystick AF point selector. 325 AF points, 169 PDAF points. AF-C custom settings should improve focus tracking, but i'd be surprised if this camera comes anywhere near the Nikon D500 in AF performance. Looks like Fuji has tweaked a lot of smaller things in the camera which should theoretically add up to a more full-featured mirrorless machine -- which it should be at this price point. Did they tweak the right things? Remains to be seen, but UI, haptics and overall performance seem to be fine-tuned from what was already a very good camera for 90% of photographic applications. Did Fuji manage to touch that elusive 10% to make a true mirrorless sports/action-worthy camera? Maybe. But some of that might depend on lens selection, as AF speed is known to be somewhat lens-dependent throughout the Fuji line.
    On the surface, the XT2 announcement begs the question, is Fuji finally ready for prime time? It competes directly with high performance prosumer DX DSLRs like the Nikon D500 and Canon 7DII, with an impressive spec sheet and tons of new features. If you're mainly concerned about sports/action, the D500 is probably a better choice, but this is clearly Fuji's most "pro" camera to date, moreso even than the XPro2, whose aesthetic is much more oriented toward classic rangefinder. They share sensors and some features, but the XT2 is designed to work better with zoom lenses, however, and has more advanced video options, though it loses the hybrid VF.
    Of its mirrorless competitors, it shoots right to the top of the field, slotting above Panasonic and Olympus m4/3 options and Sony's APS-C bodies (which still suffer from limited lens options). At its price point, it also competes with some of the lower-specced models in Sony's full frame mirrorless line, as well as entry-level full frame DSLRs. But one gets the sense it may have been rushed to market to take on the Nikon D500. Choosing between the two for many users might come down to available lens selection, an area where Nikon DX should be much stronger than it is. While you can equip the XT2 with 2.8 zooms, Fuji also has a line of fast primes in focal lengths and max apertures which Nikon doesn't offer for DX-- like the 14/2.8, 16/1.4, 23/1.4, 56/1.2, and 90/2. That makes the Fuji system pretty versatile, although Nikon still has more lenses overall, as well as more exotics (not that you'd use a T/S lens on a crop body, but still).
    I was excited about the XP2, but i thought the initial MSRP was a bit high. The XT2 is slightly more affordable at launch, but also seems to justify its price point a bit better, with even more pro-oriented features, particularly in the way of AF, video, and flash. That makes it real tough if, like me, you have both Nikon and Fuji lenses and are trying to decide between XT2 and D500. Of course, if you don't need all the new goodies, the XT1 prices should be dropping as well.
     
  1. Eric, you bring up a good point about the video. I've read that the X-Pro2 is actually capable of 4K video, but needs a soft ware switch to implement it. Is it just pure marketing segmentation that prevent them from doing that? Assuming of course that they could actually do so.
     
  2. I'm also amazed the XT-2 has met release this soon, but a pleasant sight it is. Just because it hit before September doesn't qualify as a rush in my view. On paper it looks as if the Autofocus system is set to deliver, my hope is it will be worth waiting for. I'm glad Fuji kept the styling and general button placements as is and it did include what we all hoped for, the joy stick, but that seemed a no brainer. Had it not been included that would have been weird. So looks like the XT-2 adopted all of the features expected derived from the XP-2 but with the enhanced platform IMO. I'm in 3 months now with my XT-1 and I'm will be perfectly happy to sell it and take on the XT-2, or maybe hang on to the XT-1, not sure yet. The 18-55 is such a great lens I'm having difficulty deciding a fixed lens choice. Glad to see the bigger grip on the XT-2 obviously housing a bigger battery, as it better be. Battery life in the XT-1 is a major gripe of mine.
     
  3. I've read that the X-Pro2 is actually capable of 4K video, but needs a soft ware switch to implement it. Is it just pure marketing segmentation that prevent them from doing that? Assuming of course that they could actually do so.​
    Fuji execs have been quoted as saying they could add 4k video to the XP2 with firmware, but have no plans to do so. So, yeah, that's market segmentation. But it also makes sense from a technical standpoint. The XP2 doesnt have a battery grip option, which in the XT2 increases the 4k record time to 30 minutes.
    I'm also amazed the XT-2 has met release this soon, but a pleasant sight it is. Just because it hit before September doesn't qualify as a rush in my view.​
    Fuji obviously could have waited longer, but they may have been swayed by the D500's brisk sales, since the two cameras are direct competitors. I didnt mean to imply that the XT2 was released prematurely.
    Glad to see the bigger grip on the XT-2 obviously housing a bigger battery, as it better be. Battery life in the XT-1 is a major gripe of mine.​
    This is an issue with mirrorless cameras, period, not just Fuji's. Good to see them being proactive about this. The gripped-up XT2 can fit three batteries at once, for approx. 1000 shots before recharge. I also like the fact that you can goose the performance by using all three batteries at once. Grips which only increase battery life and dont also allow for faster FPS are kind of disappointing IMO. this also allows for different configurations of the camera, i.e. you can equip it for street shooting w/out grip and a small prime, or for eventing or reportage with the grip, extra batteries, and zooms. The styling is virtually unchanged from the original XT1, except for the flippy screen, joystick and new buttons, so it shouldn't be a difficult transition for current XT1 owners. Looks like a winner to me, and probably less of a niche camera than the XP2 (which isn't going to get all the AF improvements of the XT2, btw).

    oh yeah, Fuji also announced some new lenses: a 23/2, 50/2, and an 80/2.8 macro, all of which are weather-resistant.
     
  4. I presume the f2 config on the new lenses equates to optimum performance otherwise I don't see the point. Good to see though, I missed that. Also I just learned the XT-2s metering includes a multi segment mode, now we have 4 options.
     
  5. Eric, yer all over it. I do love the XP2 very glad for it and that I waited. I'm sort of in that niche :) It could use a tilting LCD.
     
  6. I presume the f2 config on the new lenses equates to optimum performance otherwise I don't see the point​
    you mean rather than the existing 1.4 lenses? the performance remains to be seen on a case by case basis, but the design impetus seems to be, more compact and element-proof. it's worth noting that with the new additions, Fuji now has 4 WR zooms and 6 WR primes.
     
  7. Certainly weather resistant lenses are a welcome determining factor in a purchasing decision. It's interesting that there are Fuji lenses with WR and without WR. If they were all WR there would be no discussion of the issue. Historically within lens development and construction throughout lens manufacturing brands, there's a pattern among slower lenses yielding superior lens performance regarding resolution and other optical performance characteristics. This doesn't entirely ring true though, as its important if it is important to the purchaser to do the research on a particular lens. It seems that as Fuji continues to develop camera and optical lens products, they do produce progressive, or improved products that I find quite appealing providing a sense of confidence in my purchasing decision or process. With the new advent of the XT-2, it looks as if Fuji is continuing its tradition to present a camera that punches well above its weight, this is good to see. The list of desirable characteristics are many and at risk of repeating myself, the XT-2 will find its way in my camera case, I think its that good and like many, I'll be awaiting the hundred tests that will be between now and then. Gone are the questions as to whether or not mirrorless camera's have a place in Photography. Hasselblad really nailed that and I think Fuji has done a lot to secure itself within the long gone debate.
     
  8. another thing with Fuji lenses is focus speed. many of the older XF lenses aren't exactly speed demons. the newer 35/2 is said to focus a bit faster than the older 35/1.4 (which i have). tests i saw indicated they were different-performing lenses -- the 35/2 was better in some parameters, the 35/1.4 in others. Fuji is saying it delayed the 120 macro in favor of the shorter primes because its customer base wanted more compact lenses. the notion of a camera company which actually listens to its customer base is a revelation to Nikon users, i know...
    Does the XT2 punch above its weight? IDK. at its price point, it trails only the Nikon D500 in the APS-C field, and there are still some advantages to full frame cameras. It's not exactly a revolutionary camera, but it can be said to be evolutionary, in that it improves--considerably--on its predecessor. The Fuji system is pretty attractive overall, and seems to have matured in terms of both camera bodies and available lenses. I dont think there's any question as to whether mirrorless cameras have a place in photography at this point, as we now have several complete systems to choose from. And the XT2 does look like the Fuji body i was waiting for-- i scooped up the XE1 and invested in lenses while waiting for the performance metrics to iterate to an acceptable level-- although the IQ was there from day one, even with the 16mp sensor.
     
  9. Maybe that was why Fuji in New Zealand were running a discounted promotion last month ...
    The XT1 would just cheaper. Wouldn't even mind a XT1 after the XT3 is released. Does what I need. With my dSLR currently haven't even taken a single proper video with it. Love its nice for travelling thou. It is like my Nikon FM2 with smaller primes.
     
  10. f2 config on the new lenses equates to optimum performance otherwise I don't see the point​
    I also assume that this also a brave effort by Fuji to keep with a "smaller is better ethos" that mirrorless, at least once upon a time, tried to maintain is their main advantage. It is good to have a choice.
    Re grips. To my mind, the real advantage of a grip is that you have portrait-oriented controls. Anyone who spends a lot of time shooting in a portrait orientation can appreciate the advantage of having repositioned controls. 1000 shots is good, but of course a DLSR will get that with just one battery. The XT-2 looks very nice though.
     
  11. the real advantage of a grip is that you have portrait-oriented controls. Anyone who spends a lot of time shooting in a portrait orientation can appreciate the advantage of having repositioned controls. 1000 shots is good, but of course a DLSR will get that with just one battery.​
    yes, i forgot to mention the XT2 grip does enable portrait-oriented shooting, with a separate shutter button, and AF joystick. This is certainly a benefit for vertical shooters. The grip also mitigates one of the weaknesses of mirrorless -- short battery life -- as well as enables longer 4k videos and increased frame rate. It can also be recharged with a DC adapter. Seemingly, Fuji has thought of everything here, although adding the grip does make the body more DSLR-like.
    As for the "smaller is better ethos," Fuji has stated its newer primes are a response to customer feedback, and of course, they can be used with smaller Fuji bodies like the XT10 and XE2. That said, the XT2 w/grip is designed to balance with the bigger lenses in Fuji's arsenal, the 16-55, 50-140, 18-135, and 100-400, which ostensibly offer higher performance, but less-obvious weight (and cost) savings over their DSLR equivalents. All that adds up to versatility, as the XT2 can be configured for smallish/lightish, or for applications which require longer/heavier glass.

    Whether the $1600 price tag is worth it is another question. It's perhaps a no-brainer for devotees of Fuji who have already bought into the system, but also represents a 60% premium over the current price of the Sony A6300, which has somewhat similar specs, if not exactly the same features. The Sony doesn't have direct AF point selection, and an arguably-weaker lens lineup, without any native 2.8 zooms. And the Sony 16-50 kit lens is nowhere near as good as the Fuji 18-55, which means to get the best out of the Sony system, you'll have to spend hundreds more on a better lens, which makes the price differential a wash.
     
  12. I could use better understanding of having 2 cards. Obviously having 2 cards is better than 1, but is this simply a technical case of 1card filling up and pouring over to the other, or is it a case of 1 card having a different function than the other? Should the buyer go with 2 identical cards, or can they differ? Certainly video is most of the issue here, right?
     
  13. Obviously having 2 cards is better than 1, but is this simply a technical case of 1card filling up and pouring over to the other, or is it a case of 1 card having a different function than the other? Should the buyer go with 2 identical cards, or can they differ? Certainly video is most of the issue here, right?​
    Having 2 card slots is more "pro" in that for wedding shooters and the like, you can set one card to automatically backup your files. You can also set them to overflow. (this isn't so much of an issue nowadays with high-capacity SD cards, but a few years ago, the highest capacity was 4 gigs, so it was conceivable you might run out of memory space over the course of a day. Currently, you can get 128g SD cards, so the camera will run out of battery long before you deplete the available memory on on of those). it's also helpful to have two cards for photojournalism assignments where you have to upload images to the edit desk in the middle of an event. With two card slots, you can pop out one card and keep shooting. Of course, you could always just carry extra cards on you, but it's neat to have double card slots. Another use for that is if you want to separate images on different cards, for instance if you did a portrait shoot and want to upload them as a set, while keeping them separate from landscape or candid images. i'm not sure if this is true with the XT2, but in my Nikon D3s, i can set one card to RAW and one to JPEG, or enable one card for stills and one for video. You dont have to use the same type of SD cards in each slot, but for maximum performance with the XT2, you want UHS-II SD cards. if you use one fast card and one slow card and have them write at the same time, they may only write at the speed of the slower card. i think you need the UHS-II type of cards to do 4k video as well. And of course, 4k video will eat up available card space pretty quickly. All in all, 2 card slots is a good thing to have, even if you're not a pro.
     
  14. Eric, Thanks for that, I use a, SanDisk Extreme Pro 32GB 280MB/s HCII that is more than adequate for my XT-1, although I shoot RAW-FINE which adds up and the card that I use in a way, should be a starting point for all modern D-Cams, or anything less, or less writing speed would be a limitation. When the future brings an XT-2 my hope is to have the flexibility to write jpegs to 1 card and RAWs to the next. I hope it works out that way.
     
  15. I'm definitely getting one of these, because I love the old style of controls, and never fully got comfortable with modern dslr design. The colors from these XT cameras are just beautiful as well.
     
  16. Does the XT2 have built in GPS? Does any mirror less camera have built in GPS? It is essential for my type of photography, and I presently use a Nikon GP1 tethered to my DSLR's, but would love to jump ship to a Fuji mirror less option with in built GPS, maybe it will come with the XT3 or XPRo3!
     
  17. Wireless function
    Geotagging, Wireless communication (Image transfer), View & Obtain Images, Remote camera shooting,PC Autosave, instax printer print
     
  18. The spec of the new XT-2 lacks GPS but does have 4k video which is of no interest to me. The video on my XT-10 works well enough and the upgrade from 16mp to 24mp is not enough to encourage me to by one. GPS would have tipped the balance for me. I would not pay $1600 for the new camera without it, so have bought an XT-1 which has the same sensor as my XT-10
    I have got amazing 1 metre wide enlargements from my 16mp XT-10. The dynamic range and lack of shadow noise blows away my FF and APS Canon DSLRS.
    The larger viewfinder, water resistance and buffer of the XT-1 at 8fps is a big improvement on my XT-10. I was able to buy the 10-24 F4 zoom with the XT-1 for much the same price as a new XT-2. I am very happy with my decision
     
  19. The dynamic range and lack of shadow noise blows away my FF and APS Canon DSLRS​
    It took longer for FF to become popular than it took to be redundant.
     

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