Fuji stops black and white... :(

Discussion in 'Film and Processing' started by iosif_astrukov, Apr 8, 2018.

  1. If you were still shooting weddings or high volumes of portraits on film, NPS(or was it NPC or NPH?-I can't keep them straight) had one advantage LAST YEAR in that it was the last 220 film produced.

    Fuji pulled the plug on their last remaining 220 films last March(2017) or so I think.
     
  2. Maybe it's me, but C41 is a lot more hassle to get right in scanning than E6. The only positive I see for C41 in a "hybrid workflow" (=scanning) is price indeed.

    I don't do a lot of colour work, but still have some Agfa Precisa CT100 left, and a chain store that still offers E6 development at very reasonable prices. The downside is now that I've understood this Agfa film to be re-branded second-pick Fuji.... so if that also goes away, that would be a pity. It's a lot cheaper than the Fuji E6 films here.

    I've got some Acros 100 in 120 and 35mm, and with this bad news, will stock some more. I quite like it even if I'm quite sure I've not yet hit the sweet spot with my development.
     
  3. Never bothered me before, with a proper scanner.
     
  4. I've got a proper scanner and know how to use it; but E6 doesn't require the correction for the orange mask like C41 does.
     
  5. IF you use Vuescan and are scanning older Kodak emulsions, C-41 is a snap to get right assuming the negatives haven't color shifted. Unfortunately, with newer stuff like Ektar and the current Portra films you can either hope to find a profile that's close enough(which there's not really one-Portra 160, for example, is not like 160NC or 160VC) or use a generic profile and tweak it.

    Like I said, with slide films you have an absolute color reference for what it looks like. In Nikon Scan, I can just hit auto curves and auto levels and end up with a scan that's pretty much dead on. That's true even with notoriously difficult films like Velvia. Epson Scan needs a bit more tweaking, but it still does well.
     
  6. I have an old Minolta DiMAGE scanner and I seldom alter anything if the exposure in the camera was correct. They just look like the scene I remember.
     
    mikheilrokva likes this.
  7. I'm using VueScan, with cheap Kodak ColorPlus 200, for which there is no profile. Safest way is to get decent colours (as far as this emulsion allows, it isn't great stuff to start with) is scanning a unexposed part, and lock exposure and next lock base colour. That gives consistent results. So the problem is not getting results. The point was that E6 is just simpler to get good results, in my view.
     
    mikheilrokva likes this.
  8. this is exactly what I do and my results from c41 are great.
     
    mikheilrokva likes this.
  9. Mhm. That's called "removing orange mask" or something. After that, things are easy so no need for me to pay triple price for film and developing.
     
  10. The low gamma of C41 films, which is also the reason for more exposure latitude, makes them harder to print, in both exposure and color balance.

    The traditional way to color balance was to balance for the average over the whole negative. (Put a diffusion filter over the lens, and a color meter underneath.)

    I suspect that it is easy for scanning software to do something similar. If the software doesn't, and you do it manually, it might be harder.

    E6 films have tighter color tolerance, as you can't adjust in printing (if you view with a projector).
     
  11. It was $7 where I got mine, and about $!0 each for TMZ and Delta 3200.

    It was buying the three rolls at the same time, that made me think about the pricing.

    But yes, I suspect that they sell less TMZ and Delta 3200 than Portra 160.
     
  12. and the prices of the Acros went crazy... in BH they are discontinued, in macodirect are more than 8 €, in amazon I saw even 10 £ and 22 $...

    I thought to buy several but I just won't give twice and third for a single roll... greedy b.... the same happened when they announced the discontinuing of the Ektachrome back in 2013
     
  13. Fuji was never that most popular with b/w film, it was always Kodak Tri-X and Ilford HP5 right. Fuji is also down to one film now 400ProH or the newer NPH only in 35mm and 120 format. Then there is Provia and Velvia.

    I have a Coolscan 400 or I had. Doesn't work now. Cannot be repaired. I read that some firm can replace the USB logic chip.

    Mostly pro's have gone digital. Slide film is a lot more restricted even Provia, after the sun's down, the shadows block up. Not very versatile. Astia might had been more versatile. E6 are the most expensive film and the most expensive to develop. Some can DIY the processing but not every country now can get access to these chemistry kits as the demand has dried up.

    Even if Kodak comes out wasn't that only planned for 35mm and just one emulsion.
     
  14. Over the past few years, Kodak has shown a general trend of bringing out new emulsions in 35mm first and then migrating to larger formats as the product is established if demand increases. Ektar 100 was that way-it started out as 35mm, and now can be had in sizes up to 8x10.

    IF the new Ektachrome ever happens, I suspect that it will expand into 120. From what I've read and heard in discussions the target is something like the old E100G, which actually is quite a good film. My recollection of it was that it was very "sterile" feeling, but just a good general purpose slide film. I just picked up some in 120(along with 18 rolls of Plus-X!) after not shooting it in years, so I'll see if my recollection is correct. When I could still get it, I always preferred E100GX, which was a tad bit warmer and got rid of some of the "Ektachrome Blues" that were inherent in E100G.

    If I had my druthers and could only get one slide film from Kodak, I'd take something with the grain and dynamic range of E100G and the saturation/color profile of Elite Chrome. Elite Chrome was always a great middle of the road film that was a bit punchier and warmer than E100G but not as saturated as E100VS(Kodak's poor attempt at a Velvia clone). Its one downside vs. the E100 series films was that its grain technology was a generation or two behind. I use to shoot a lot of both films(and still pull out some frozen Elite Chrome-one of the best general purpose slide films I've ever used) and can pick out an Elite Chrome scan right off by looking at the grain. While I'm also compiling my wish list, can we also get the caucasian skin tones of EPP(Ektachrome Plus)? E100GX was decent at that, but EPP stuck around a LONG time past its prime for that very reason.

    With that said, it wouldn't surprise me if the new Ektachrome(again, if it ever happens) IS something like that. After all, Kodak use to make NC and VC(Neutral Color and Vivid Color) versions of Portra, and then a UC version(Ultra Color) in 400 speed. The current film splits the difference between NC and VC, and overall is quite a good film in all speeds. I do miss 400UC, though.
     
  15. I have shot E100G in 35mm and 120, still have a few rolls left in the freezer. It does look laboratory gaming style sterile to me. Fuji films were more blues and greens. At golden hour and after it was Fuji but i didn't use it at night due to the shadows.
     
  16. Stop buying stale/deadstock film. Buy new fresh stock whenever available if you want it on the shelves tomorrow. Know too many people with freezers old materials who kvetch incessantly about today's prices and limited choice. Always ask when they last bought fresh-dated film. Meeting over.
     
  17. I bought mine when E100G was announced to be discontinued, so I guess they were fresh but already decided by the manufacturer. I guess for Fuji b/w film doesn't make business sense these days. Some smaller company might had been OK with it but they have a more demand digital product and other stuff the Fujifilm company does like cosmetic and commercial printing.

    I have fresh Acros 100 in my freezer also, imported to New Zealand from USA since here is like 3x the price. Yeah .. other countries with less film demand just gouge you for it. B/w film to most are Kodak and Ilford. Slide film ... to hobbyists like us it is really expensive, we pay again 3x a roll here vs the USA, processing is like $14US these days a roll. So I just collect up 1 or 2yr and send them over to the USA for processing and they are cleaner also. Mounting is offered also, not here. Even some years ago, mounting we had pay to per slide - yup for cardboard mounts even. Might had been 30c USD per slide.

    Someone gave me a 35mm bulk loader, felt heavy, I opened it in a dark bag and found I had 1/2 or 2/3 of a roll in there. Did some development with a short length and it was Fuji MS 100. But the thing is given this thing is unknown quality and how it is stored, and how expensive E6 processing is. Just what do I do .......

    Fortunately B&H and Freestyle only charge you $5US or $9US to send a 10 or 15 rolls overseas. Yeah that's incredible. But labs don't have that.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2018
  18. I buy new film stock if it interests me when it's available. Heck, I do it sometimes just to support the effort, as I did with P3200 last month.

    I've been hunting for E100G to have some to shoot side-by-side the new stuff if/when it becomes available.

    BTW, you've been preaching doom and gloom lately and now you're chastising folks for buying old stock(I'm guessing that's partially directed at me since I commented on just buying some Plus-X and E100G).

    I spent about $2K last year on fresh, in date film from Kodak, Fuji and Ilford. That money was split between B&H, Freestyle, Adorama, and my local camera store. So far, I'm on track to spend about the same this year. I know that's a drop in the bucket of the entire industry, but I resent any implication that I'm not "doing my part" to support the production of fresh, in date film.
     
    Dave Luttmann and Vincent Peri like this.
  19. "Stop buying stale/deadstock film. Buy new fresh stock whenever available if you want it on the shelves tomorrow. Know too many people with freezers old materials who kvetch incessantly about today's prices and limited choice. Always ask when they last bought fresh-dated film. Meeting over."

    Buying the old stock up is a driver to the reintroductions......
    Meeting is never over.......
     
    Dave Luttmann and mikheilrokva like this.
  20. BTW, you've been preaching doom and gloom lately and now you're chastising folks for buying old stock(I'm guessing that's partially directed at me since I commented on just buying some Plus-X and E100G).

    I spent about $2K last year on fresh, in date film from Kodak, Fuji and Ilford. That money was split between B&H, Freestyle, Adorama, and my local camera store. So far, I'm on track to spend about the same this year. I know that's a drop in the bucket of the entire industry, but I resent any implication that I'm not "doing my part" to support the production of fresh, in date film.

    No clue what your buying habits are but you'll have to admit it's tiresome having people who congratulate themselves for thriftiness then turn and howl about price and selection. You get it. They don't.
     

Share This Page

1111