Fuji GA645W

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by canwewin, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. Hello everyone,

    Not really new to MF, currently using a Yashica Mat
    124, but
    I would like to buy a better camera.
    I would like to know if 400$ is a fair price for a Fuji
    GAF645W?
    For the same price I could get a Bronica S2A with a
    75mm Nikon lens.
    The camera will be used mainly for landscape.

    Any suggestion?

    Thank you
     
  2. For $400 or a bit more you can get a Fuji GW690. For landscapes, the 6x9 format will impress you. I've been shooting 6x6 TLRs- Yashica, Minolta, Rollei- for years, and tried a 6x4.5 (Bronica ETR system). Then I bought a GW690, and the image quality is much nicer. That extra real estate on the negative really makes a difference.
     
  3. For $400 you could get far more flexibility with a 645 kit(Mamiya, Bronica, Pentax)with film backs and affordable wide angle lenses. The Bronica S2a is way over-priced with only a 75mm and, frankly, ancient.
     
  4. Daniel thank you for the quick reply.
    The fact is that my enlarger can go up
    to 6x6 not more....so 6x9 or even 6x7
    would be too much....
     
  5. Thank you C Watson for the info!
     
  6. I think you are referring to the Fuji GA645W. If so, it appears that $400 for one in fine condition seems very reasonable. One characteristic of the Bronica, or another SLR, is that it is easier to use grad filters on landscapes, to tone down the sky compared to the land exposure, but if this is not a concern the Fuji is a very handy camera. As you are considering a wide angle optic, the larger and more manual (no exposure metering) GSW690III would give an equivalent field of view at the larger 6x9 cm size, but that is priced about twice that of the used GA645W, is manually focussed (with less DOF than the 6x4,5 cm camera) and requires a separate meter.
    I just noted your enlarger limitations.
     
  7. $400 for an S2, if in excellent condition with the 120/220 back, is not out of line. Perhaps slightly high, but not by much. The beauty of this particular camera is that it focuses very close--much closer than a Hasselblad.
    "Landscape" doesn't necessarily mean "wide,"
    does it? Everyone has different taste, but I seem to use a 150 for many landscape shots. That's why I'd stick with an slr.
     
  8. $400 for an S2, if in excellent condition with the 120/220 back, is not out of line. Perhaps slightly high, but not by much. The beauty of this particular camera is that it focuses very close--much closer than a Hasselblad.
    "Landscape" doesn't necessarily mean "wide,"
    does it? Everyone has different taste, but I seem to use a 150 for many landscape shots. That's why I'd stick with an slr.
     
  9. From what I've seen, $400 is a fair price for a Fuji GA645W in good condition, but neither that nor a Bronica S2A would be my choice for a landscape camera.
    With almost any of the Fuji rangefinders (from a little GA645W to a big GSW690--there is an old interchangeable-lens model for which the lenses are scarce), you're limited to the fixed lens. Also, using many types of filters (such as graduated neutral-density or polarizing filters) on any rangefinder will be relatively difficult. With the Bronica S2A, you're talking about a relatively old (and long ago replaced by the Bronica SQ series) system for which lenses, accessories, and/or repairs will be both limited and comparatively difficult to find.
    So what then? For $400 you can go somewhere reputable like KEH.com and get a Mamiya M645 1000s, a 120 insert, a basic prism, and a 45mm f/2.8 lens. Then later you can get, say, an 80mm f/2.8 or a 150mm f/3.5 lens for $100 or so, or good-quality lenses of other focal lengths from 24 to 500mm for very reasonable prices. And you'll be able to swap lenses in the field, in a few seconds, and you'll be able to see in the viewfinder whether that polarizer or split neutral density filter is giving the effect you want. And lenses, accessories, and repairs will be comparatively easy to find.
     
  10. "$400 for an S2, if in excellent condition with the 120/220 back, is not out of line. Perhaps slightly high, but not by much. The beauty of this particular camera is that it focuses very close--much closer than a Hasselblad."
    For that, it would have to be in mint shape which most of these aren't. The same money would buy an SQ-Ai or SQ-B kit, either of them newer and more flexible than any of the S series relics.
     
  11. Thank you all for the suggestions,
    I think I'll take a look at the Mamiya 645!
     
  12. Thank you for all the information.
    I recently got a Mamiya M645 1000s with three lenses (45, 80, 150) and a PD prism finder in mint condition for 250$

    Looking forward to shot some rolls!
    L.
     

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