From kodak brownie to iPhone

Discussion in 'Phone and Mobile' started by jerry_diakiw, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. Here is my latest article on the history of the evolution of photography through the prism of my own personal experiences since the 1940s

    http://lifeinlofi.com/2012/12/24/guest-post-from-box-camera-to-iphoneography/#more-20174

    In the Toronto Star Sat. Dec 22 Mia Freeman, curator of the “Faking it” exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York said, “The
    arrival of the camera phone is the most important development in photography since Kodak.

    The article linked above, ” Kodak Brownie to Iphoneography” , traces my evolution as a photographer from my first kodak Brownie in the
    1940s to a life long black and white darkroom addict, to hi rez scanning and photoshop, and giclee printing, to Iphonegraphy. I illustrate
    by sharing one photo from my early darkroom days, then the same photo scanned and giclee’d and the same image treated with a variety
    of Iphone apps on an ipad. Gone are my computer, my cameras ( but for my iphone) my darkroom.

    I too, feel the iphone, with the array of accompanying apps is a revolution in art, as dramatic as the first photographs were to oil paintings.
    So too, will the iphone evolve out of traditional photography but will be forever changed, as it is, IMHO, a totally new art form. Google
    Carlein Van der Beek or go to the iphoneography flickr site. or visit the premier site for iphonegraphers at lifeinlofi.com.
     
  2. My opinions:

    The arrival of the camera phone is the most important development in photography since Kodak.

    Maybe, but digital was an darn important development also. A very high percentage of images are taken with phones and the percentage will increase.

    ... the iphone, with the array of accompanying apps is a revolution in art, ...

    Disagree. Camera phone images have been accepted as art, but that doesn't mean that it is a revolution. Yes, great art can be made with inferior equipment, but most artists would rather work with the best tools and media. The gap will narrow, but dedicated photographic equipment will always be better. Michelangelo didn't sculpt in sandstone. Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, & Annie Leibovitz didn't use the most common cameras of their time.
     
  3. I wonder how ibferior an iPhone is to Henri carrier bresson's rangefinder. 8 mp! In an iPhone. Zoom lens would be I
    resting what a ansell Adams or bresson would do with an iPhone I just think work like what carlein van der beek is doing
    with her iphone onky and her battery of app with major exhibitions of her work all over europe with her image printed hug
    on aluminium is groundbreaking and revolutionary work FOR ME. Check out her flickr collection carlein . She gave me
    a two hour tutorial in a Starbucks. It was mind blowing!
    Btw. I agree digital was huge! I
     

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