For Nikon D40 users, which macro lens is best?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by magdabeda, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. Hey everyone, I bought a dSLR Nikon D40 about three weeks ago. I love
    shooting macro, droplets, flowers, eyes, ect.
    The problem is, that I don't have any clue which macro lens to buy. There are
    so many, but don't work automaticly with the D40. Any suggestions that work
    auto and manual with the D40, would be greatly appreciated

    Thanks Magda.
     
  2. The 60mm AF-S and 105mm AF-S VR will work but are very expensive. Why not learn to manually focus and maybe manual settings for an inexpensive lens.
     
  3. Oh I can manually focus, but some lenses are completely incompatible with the D40. That's my worry. Usually i shoot on Manual, but auto is always something good to have. If not... then maybe, you could tell me lenses that are really sharp and great for macro, no auto... but still cooperate with the D40.

    Greatly Appreciated
    Magda,
     
  4. Other than for the issue of not autofocusing on a D40, the 100/105mm f2.8 macro lenses from Tamron, Tokina and Sigma are all very good. They cost a fraction of what the 105mm AF-S VR Nikkor does and are all otherwise compatable with a D40.

    Something that you will soon learn about macro is that autofocus is almost useless anyway. The depth of field at the short distances and high magnification is so shallow that AF simply doesn't work consistently. That being the case, the lack of autofocusing on a D40 for macro is not a major issue.

    The drawback is that you would still have to manually focus at "normal" shooting distances. You pay your money and you take you choice.
     
  5. The Sigma 150mm and 180mm macro lenses have the HSM motor so will work fully with the D40. As yet the 50mm, 70mm, and 105mm have not been updated to include the motor but all are superb macro lenses. HSM is the equivalent of AF-S. http://www.sigma-imaging-uk.com/lenses/macro/macro.htm
     
  6. Wow. Thank you for telling me these things Richard and Nick.
     
  7. You can buy a used 55mm f2.8 or f3.5 micro (I've recommended this course of action so
    many times people are tiring of me saying it I bet) for a little over a hundred bucks. It is
    totally "compatible" with your camera... if you don't mind going into manual mode,
    manual focus, and no meter. If you are shooting still subjects, it's not a problem. Just
    experiment with the exposure and look at the histogram and you'll be fine. That's what i
    do. In fact, I would rather manually focus at close distances anyway, for the reasons stated
    above.

    If you want something totally compatible in terms of AF and all possible metering modes,
    choose between the AFS 60mm (brand new) and the AFS 105 with VR.

    The Tamron 90 seems to be great to go with, too. All modes supported, but you will need
    to manually focus.
     
  8. Since macro work doesn't depend on speed, the D40's ability to mount old non-Ai 55mm Micro Nikkors is a huge advantage. These were some of the sharpest lenses Nikon made. eBay's usually clogged with these at very low prices--cheap enough for some experimentation.
     
  9. Magda,

    What is your budget?
     
  10. Yes some of the older pre Ai 55mm f3.5 lenses may be a good excuse to get a used or new D40(x)as a second body ^^.
     
  11. Great. Gotta love ebay.
    My budget ... well, lets say I can go up to 500 $ Canadian. More could be a possiblity, BUT i'd rather buy a few other things too. Or I could get in debt... but i'd rather not :p
     
  12. Magda,
    go for an old pre Ai or Ai 55mm Micro-Nikkor. The D40 is a joy to use with these old lenses, and they produce outstanding images... and they're REALLY cheap these days. Regarding your concern about the D40's compatibility with older lenses... in an odd twist, the D40/40x/60 bodies are actually compatible with more lenses than any of their "big brother" Nikon DSLRs!

    As I've said elsewhere on photo.net, the combination of the D40/40x/60 small lightweight body with an older manual Nikkor is a real joy to use. Not having the meter is no big deal. Just take a test shot, check the LCD, adjust aperture or speed, and shoot away... for a LOT cheaper than a big heavy body + auto-focus zoom + too many bells and whistles that take your thinking away from the subject! Have fun.
     
  13. "Oh I can manually focus, but some lenses are completely incompatible with the D40. That's my worry."

    The D40x can handle most older lens. For more info see Thom's chart here:

    http://bythom.com/lensacronyms.htm
     
  14. That website you sent Manh, is very helpful... and Thank you everyone for telling me some great tips. I thought very kidishly about lenses I must admit.
     

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