Flash Modifiers and Flash Brackets

Discussion in 'Wedding and Event' started by simon_hickie|1, Jul 7, 2013.

  1. I was testing out a Lightsphere clone on an Olympus OM-D mounted FL-50 flash in portrait mode without a flash bracket. I've heard it said on this forum that some use a Demb Flip-it type attachment in portrait orientation also without a flash bracket.
    Now it might be me, but in this test shot where the subject is pretty close to a pale wall at the back, the shadows don't look great and there's a lack of modelling for the face even though there's a general lack of harsh shadows.
    I think a bracket would put the shadows in a better place, but would do little with respect to directional light. I also suspect that diffused off-camera flash from higher up and to the left would be better (easily achieved with my D7000 and SB800) too. Would this be a fair analysis?
    00bo7E-541213784.jpg
     
  2. I use a bracket, the Quantum flash units come with a dome. This setup will surely get rid of the shadows.
     
  3. I think a bracket would put the shadows in a better place, but would do little with respect to directional light. I also suspect that diffused off-camera flash from higher up and to the left would be better (easily achieved with my D7000 and SB800) too. Would this be a fair analysis?​
    Well, in this case, I would say the flash should be camera right so as to short light the face. As to diffusion, that's simply a matter of how you want to modify the light for the look you want to achieve. In this example, I would have probably just bounced the flash off the wall on the right. This would provide softer light (diffusion doesn't necessarily mean soft light. Soft light is achieved by increasing the size of the light source). Now this is all analytical, meaning that with this shot, I would have probably had my flash on camera and simply bounced off the wall, camera right. At that point, the Demb Flip It is more useful because you can use it as a flag to block any light going towards the subject and creating a shadow you don't want.
     
  4. Thanks John. Agreed - short lighting would be better. It would have involved blinding the person next to her, but I get the point! On camera from that direction would have involved "right hand under" grip though, which I find rather difficult to do (need more practice). Also a good tip on flagging - I tend to use the 'black foamie thing' for this.
     
  5. Simon - "right hand under" grip though, which I find rather difficult to do"

    I use my left hand to hold the bracket. The camera's triggers are with the right hand. Did I miss something here?

    I have 2 types of brackets. Both will last a lifetime. Custom Brackets and Just Rite
     
  6. Bob, I'm thinking if no bracket, then if in portrait mode and bouncing to the right, then the camera needs to be rotated clockwise: i.e. shutter release at the bottom. If on a bracket, then no problem as you can point the flash independently of the camera orientation - so yes, left hand on bracket and right hand on camera grip. Thanks for the bracket suggestions: I use a stroboframe type thing which works OK for me.
     
  7. Those are really good brackets. The brackets I use are fairly heavy. I'm getting pretty sore at those long weddings. I've had back surgery and a recent surgery on the elbow. I'm also 57! Maybe next year I will putter around in a wheelchair!

    Well I'm totally with you regarding shadows. It's the only way to get rid of shadows unless the people are about 7 or 8 feet from a wall or some sort of background. I really wish I didn't have to use a bracket. Most of the time with outside events I can ditch the bracket. I use quick releases so I can pop the bracket off within about 10 seconds. The Quantum flash head I use can be hooked directly to the hot shoe of the camera.

    Simon Hickie - That sailboat photo is fantastic.
     
  8. Certainly with you on the back trouble front Bob! Ruptured disk, spinal degeneration, sciatica and a dodgy knee. I'm 57 too!!! Thanks for the comment re. sailboat. Light like that doesn't come along very often.
     

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