Film Cameras designed to allow double exposures.

Discussion in 'Modern Film Cameras' started by Garret, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. Garret

    Garret amateur wannabe

    (Administrators feel free to move this thread wherever you need to).
    I need to know which 35 mm SLR TTL film bodies are designed to allow double exposures. Any help would be appreciated.
    I've taken a step or two backwards recently from the digital SLR hysteria. I just felt the need to get back to where I started with this hobby and get away from digital for awhile just for some creative ideas that don't require new glasses, buried menus and a dizzying array of convoluted unnecessary choices. 'Seems like I'd forgotten what little I thought I knew about the art. I shoot mostly landscape.
    So, I consider myself barely an amateur: a refugee from 35 mm film cameras (Nikormat, Nikon FM, Canon...). Sold all those bodies and glass a long time ago and bought into the digital craze 100% until recently when I bought a Pentax 645Nii. My objectives are to create a few really good photographs that would look good as canvas enlargements (say, 2'x3' square or larger). I think it's called "Wall Art" today.
    So, I'm shopping for a 35 mm body, (perhaps a Nikon FM), to compliment the medium format Pentax. I need some advice.
    Rather than rebuild an entire 35 mm SLR TTL film system, my goal is to have one body and a couple decent lenses. One of the features I'm looking for in the 35 mm body is the ability to double expose. If I remember right, the Nikon FM has a button on the bottom of the camera that disengages the gear linkage attached to the film advance lever. So, the FM is one candidate.
    What are some other simple 35 mm SLR TTL film bodies that have a double exposure feature?
    Thanks
     
  2. Nikon F3 is specifically designed to allow double exposure. The "little button on the bottom" is, I believe, a hack that can be done with almost any 35mm camera.
     
  3. As far as I know (but my experience has clear limits!), any camera that has manual frame advance will do - if there is no dedicated switch for double exposure, typically you can use the rewind button on the bottom of the camera to temporarily disengage the sprockets, as with the FM. With cameras with automatic film advance, it becomes a feature that you'd need to look up in the specifications.
    That said, I prefer a dedicated switch over the bottom button, as it works easier. I use my F3 most for double exposures; it is very easy on that camera, a little switch close to the film advance lever that resets itself.
     
  4. Most or all EOS film cameras have this feature, at least EOS 5D and 30D do. This feature was not uncommon in the film days so I assume that Nikon offered it as well, but you will have to check this.
     
  5. Agreed -- virtually all 35mm film cameras allow double exposure simply by pushing in the rewind button while advancing the film advance lever.
     
  6. The original FM has this, as do the FE/FE2 - not just the hold in rewind button, but a dedicated button lever to allow shutter cocking without winding the film.
     
  7. Canon A-1's had a double exposure feature, a lever next to one of the top knobs that when moved only the shutter would be cocked. Used it a few times in my film days.
     
  8. http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00Vv3X
     
  9. Some Pentax models had specific multi-exposure features, including the MZ-S, PZ-1p and ZX-L/MZ-6, probably more. The MZ-S has a nice position on the top panel drive mode switch just for this purpose. The earlier unmotorized models would also generally allow disengaging the film advance via the button on the baseplate. It might be worth checking whether these buttons (any make, not just Pentax) would be blocked by your tripod plate, this might be a potential nuisance if you're planning to use this feature.
     
  10. Be aware that on many cameras, when you use the 'wind on while pushing the rewind release' method, the film may 'jiggle' a little so that the second exposure is not exactly on the same part of the film as the first - close, but not exact.
     
  11. Pretty much any manual wind camera will do this with a little practice - the trick, of course, is to take up the slack in the film cartridge by winding back the rewind crank before you press the rewind button and cock the shutter with the wind-on lever. I'm pretty sure the original Nikon FM and FE have dedicated multiple exposure buttons or levers. Don't know about the later versions, but I imagine they have. I know the F3 has a dedicated multi-exposure lever. There's always going to be a little "jiggle", as JDM puts it. If this is a problem, you need to look for a specialized camera with a pin register back that physically locks the film in place for the subsequent exposures. There are pin register backs (non-OEM) for the Nikon F2 and F3, among others. These turn up on The Auction Site occasionally.
     
  12. By TTL do you mean , film bodies which also have TTL flash metering/control? In my experience, the Nikon F4, F4s, F5,
    and F6. I can't remember if the N90s or F100 have it as well.

    In Non-TTL Nikon bodies,I was able to do it with the F, F2, and F3hp. With the F the double exposure process is a little
    clunky but it works.
     
  13. Garret

    Garret amateur wannabe

    *Thank you Brian. I always thought it was there specifically for double exposures. Had no idea it was a bit of a hack to begin with. Thank you.
    *Wouter: I gathered from the other comments that I'd been missing the hack as well. I too would be more comfortable with a dedicated feature designed especially to accommodate double exposures like on most of the medium format 645's and some of the medium format rangefinders. Thanks much.
    *Joe: I was aware of the double exposure feature on the EOS and Nikon digital units. Nice cameras but I'm gonna' try the film route again. I just feel drawn to it. Thanks.
    *Craig: I really didn't know that until reading your comment and those of several others. Thank you.
    *Greg: I seem to remember that about the FM I had although it was a long time ago: nothing inside the camera moved. Only the film advance lever to re-cock the shutter release. I'll have to look more closely for an original FM. The FE/2 never appealed to me at the time but now I'll have to consider those as well. Thank you.
    *Bob: I had an A-1 at one time. And I DO remember that feature@! Excellent camera and way ahead of its time. I never used it much because I was too pre-occupied with Nikon stuff.
    *Dieter: Thank you for that link. Sometimes I miss stuff in the search process. Very helpful!
    *Andrew: I had hoped someone would specifically address Pentax offerings. It seems that those cameras have always been under-rated. The tripod nuisance is a good thought as well. Thanks a lot.
     
  14. Garret

    Garret amateur wannabe

    First Prev 1 | 2
    *David: Thanks a lot for your insight I vaguely remember using my FM for double exposure. They turned out ok but it was iffy. So, when you say, "With a little practice. . ." it's probly' best I get something that has a dedicated feature to eliminate as much guess work as possible. But, that you much for your technical recommendations on the F2/3 and pin registered backs.
    *Ellis: Through The Lens metering, i.e. TTL. Not all 35 mm camera bodies had an on-board light meter. My description was intended to separate modern SLR's with TTL from those that didn't have it. I took no thought for flash photography since I'm horrible at it. Thanks for making me clarify.
     
  15. Then any of the Nikon's I listed will do.
     
  16. Garret

    Garret amateur wannabe

    Thank you.
    And, for posterity, here's the link from 2010 provided earlier in this thread titled, "What 35mm SLR's allow double exposures?" : http://www.photo.net/classic-cameras-forum/00Vv3X?start=0
    Thanks to all who replied.
     
  17. @Luke, I'm sure there are plenty of other Nikon cameras that have this feature, I only listed the ones I was certain about, particularly since they also coincided with the body type you had used before and said you were considering.
     
  18. Garret

    Garret amateur wannabe

    Les & Greg: Thanks a lot.
    This thread brought back a lot of memories of cameras, their features, their lenses, people & places I'd completely forgotten about. It musta' been a little more than a hobby back then. Maybe closer to an obsession. eh?
    Anyway, I think I've pretty well settled on the Canon A-1. I had one of those a lifetime ago and I'd since forgotten all about it until someone mentioned it here. After sorting through the recommendations offered in this thread and searching offerings at Roberts, B&H, KEH, Craig's List and fleabay, I began to remember what the A-1 and the FM felt like and a how they worked.
    The Nikon FM was nice too but I don't recall the outcome of shooting double exposure with it. I now remember specifically some double exposures I took of my ex-wife with the A-1. Several of those turned out really good! She liked them so much they were specifically mentioned in the divorce settlement. A rare compliment maybe? Ha!!
    It's always fun spending money on cameras. Fortunately, there are enablers willing to help at every turn;-) Thanks again.
     
  19. You can add Canon's New F-1 to the list. It's film rewind button (next to the shutter release on top of the camera) is used for multiple exposures, as many as you want.
     
  20. Be aware that on many cameras, when you use the 'wind on while pushing the rewind release' method, the film may 'jiggle' a little so that the second exposure is not exactly on the same part of the film as the first - close, but not exact.​



    Taking up the slack on the rewind and holding it whilst 'winding on' might help - but you would probably need three hands!
     
  21. My Nikon FM3a is manual focus, has TTL flash, and can do double exposure.
    Now that I think of it, I rarely use double / multiple exposure.
     
  22. I've been shooting with my Konica T3n lately, and it allows you to make several exposures on one frame by activating the dedicated "ME" lever.
     
  23. The best double exposure system is on the old Exakta 35mm SLR cameras. They are, however, not normally TTL cameras, unless you have one of the relatively uncommon aftermarket TTL metering prisms.
     
  24. The Pentax LX will do double exposures with supposedly good registration. It also has TTL exposure and flash, but it isn't cheap and CLA's are costly, as is true of most pro gear.
     
  25. If you want AF then Nikon N90s/N90 with a MF-26 data back will do multiple exposures and will F100, F5, F6 and Canon 1V. These are all excellent cameras available quite inexpensively in my opinion.
     

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