E6 processing mistake

Discussion in 'Large Format' started by john_d._haughton, May 24, 2002.

  1. I processed some 5x4's in a Jobo CPE2 (rotary processor) with a 3-bath + stab. E6 kit. But for the final stabilistaion bath decided not to put the dev tank back on the CPE2 because the instructions said the stabilsation bath should be less than 25 deg C. (CPE2 water bath was at 38 deg C) Unfortunately my reasoning ran out at this point and I didn't roll the dev tank on its side but just left it upright. Consequently the top third of my transparancies have not been stabilised and are lighter than the bottom two thirds with a distinct line between the two regions.

    <p>

    Will re-running the stabilsation bath correct the fault or am I in danger of damaging the trannies?
     
  2. John:

    <p>

    First give the film a good long soak at the correct temprature for the
    stabilizer, than proceed as normal. With any luck, everything will be
    fine.
     
  3. Talk to Kodak. They've seen all the mistakes (and made all of them
    too).
     
  4. If you are processing your own 4x5" E-6 never ever use the
    3 bath process, it is intended or rather was intended for press
    photographers in a hurry. They all now use digital. Use the six
    bath process, it is much softer and of better quality. Then you are
    never supposed to put the stablilaser into the processing tools,
    neither the reels or the tanks since it might cause uneven
    development later. Put the stabilasier in a small developing dish
    and put the sheet or film in there. Thus you will stabilize properly
    and not contaminate your tank and reels.
     
  5. John,

    <p>

    the stabilizer bath does usually not alter the density or color of
    the film. So I wonder whether something else has happened. Did you
    check the wet or dry film?
    The function of the stabilizer bath is to preserve film and dyes.
    Never use the stabilizer bath in your drum (as should be stated in
    the manual). The stabilizer bath does contain tensides that may
    adhere onto the plastic of the drum and reels and may cause foam in
    later developments or may even interfere with the chemicals.

    <p>

    Regards,
     

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