Dream NIKON D4

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by belamolnar, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. Just for a fun, My dream NIKON D4. So, what do you think. . . . ?
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  2. I think that eating cheese to close to bedtime can lead to strange compulsions....:)
     
  3. Make it a little smaller and it will display in line, for better or for worse.
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  4. One thing that would actually make me sit up and notice a D4 (before deciding I don't really want to spend money on a camera upgrade at the moment) would be if the C/S/M shooting mode switch moved to the other side of the lens mount, below the two programmable buttons. Where you could actually reach it with the hand that's on the camera, as opposed to with the one holding a 3kg lens nine inches away from the switch. (I appreciate that putting it near the mount is easier for moving the AF drive pin, otherwise I'd like it on the back.) I only mention it because other "deam D4" renderings still have it in the standard Nikon place.

    Just because it'll make me feel saner if people think there's a good reason for it, does anyone actually like its current position on Nikons? It could be worse - it could be the DoF preview button, like on low-end Canons - but I wonder how many Nikon body designers actually try big lenses (c.f. my rants about the ISO button position on the D700).
     
  5. Thank you JDM.
     
  6. (Oops, "dream D4".) Autofocus mode selector (not "shooting mode"; I was having a bad post) aside, nice rendering, Bela. I realised I forgot to say that while being taunted by this switch. :)
     
  7. Hi Andrew. My longer lens is a 500mm, but I never had a problem with the AF switch. Probably, because, I'm using manual focus setting most of the time? Only very rear exception. Or, I'm not a action photographer. After 45 years practice, I get the feel to get subject in focus, most of the time. I never noticed this switch moved form a set position. I did this rendering, seeing somebody creating a Leica to a Nikon D4. I like the clear top, and also like so mach the tree angular, pyramid looking, slightly curved prism, the typical Nikon F symbol. I have several Nikon F cameras, and I love them so mach, They are beautiful sculptures as well solidly build cameras, we never again going to have, in this plastic age.
     
  8. My first Nikon F, I'm still using it. My D700 not going to last, half of that the time.
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  9. Where's the dial for changing ISO?
     
  10. Hi Indraneel. If, you are referring to the Nikon F camera. You mast be a young man, whom never learned photography in a total manual way. Cameras with-out light-meter do not have, and do not need an ASO setting. The ISO setting is in your brain, Or your separate light meter, and accordingly, by experience and knowledge, you set the speed and the aperture on the camera, depend on the film you used. Like; 50, 100, 400 ISO. Manual SLR cameras, without light meter, has NO ISO setting. They don't need, only models with light-meter needed an ISO setting. I just picked up 5 rolls of T-Max film, developed, and all of them properly exposed. I believe, that is the proper way to learn photography, before somebody picking up a digital, all automatized DSLR camera to photograph.
    Have a nice day.
     
  11. My 35 mm film cameras all provide the ability to override the ISO/ASA speed encoded in the film. It's not a DSLR-
    specific feature. I used to shoot Velvia at ISO 40. Galen Rowell took it a step further. He would test a camera in
    different situations and note the ISO setting that gave him the best results. Then he would use that setting whenever
    he was shooting in similar conditions. He was effectively using ISO settings as a preprogrammed custom exposure
    compensation control.
     
  12. Why not post this in the Nikon forum? Same for the EOS specific posts, why not there as well?
    (I guess I don't get the point of this OP at all)
     
  13. C'mon, folks.
    Even you film buffs have to admit that changeable ISO settings is a major advance. Of course we could push & pull film. But you'd have to develop the entire roll that way -- you could not change for a few shots, then change back.
    I remember being in the Amazon jungle, surprised at how dark it was with a fresh roll of 36 ISO 100 Fuji in the camera. Basically I had to blow off much of that roll — it had a few shots on it from the mountains I was not going to throw away — just so I could stick in a roll of ISO 400.
    There may be reasons to enjoy film (like the longevity of film cameras), but let's not allow a red colour shift of our memories of film (AKA rose-coloured glasses) interfere with clear perception!
     
  14. But you'd have to develop the entire roll that way -- you could not change for a few shots, then change back.​
    Some cameras allow you to rewind the film and leave the leader out. You could change to a different film, shoot some, then go back to the first roll and advance back to where you were (taking pictures of the inside of the lens cap) I only did this a couple of times but it was possible. A much easier way was a medium format camera with removable backs. For my Hasselblad I would usually have 100 speed slide film and another with ~400 B&W. Of course I agree that digital with an ISO setting is easier than all of that.
     
  15. You mast be a young man, whom never learned photography in a total manual way.​
    ha ha, Bela, no I meant the D4 picture, not the F. But, indeed I never learned the full manual way; there was always a meter in the FM2 to guide me. And, only recently have I started to notice differences in 1/3 exposure changes. But I still rely on the meters and am successful only in compensating properly. My next project is to learn absolute ev values by looking at the light and scene (in terms of shutter and F stops). I am indeed fortunate to be able to use a DSLR to learn all this; I can take a shot, review and analyze it, and setup an experiment for my next shot... and so on, and all that at precise 1/3 stop variations.
    I remember being in the Amazon jungle, surprised at how dark it was with a fresh roll of 36 ISO 100 Fuji in the camera.​
    Real PROs use two bodies; one for the jungle, and one for the mountain! I remember carrying a film extractor for just these situations that called for mid roll rewinds (I was never a pro).
     
  16. Where you could actually reach it with the hand that's on the camera, as opposed to with the one holding a 3kg lens nine inches away from the switch.
    Hmm? You hand-hold a 3kg lens?! Uuuh...
    I never use the S focusing mode since it is based on the concept of focus and recompose, at which point the subject will usually be a different distance away. I focus from by pressing AF-ON button which is on the camera, and the AF switch on the camera is always in "C". To recompose, I simply let go of the AF-ON button.
     
  17. I love the F. It was built like a truck and performed like a Porsche.
     
  18. Sorry about the radio silence - work crisis.
    Hmm? You hand-hold a 3kg lens?! Uuuh...​
    200mm f/2, and yes, sometimes (when a monopod is inconvenient); also with my 150-500, which is admittedly only 1.5kg. With my 500 f/4, I'm manual-focussing, so my hand is even farther from the ISO control even though I'm on a tripod.
    I never use the S focusing mode since it is based on the concept of focus and recompose, at which point the subject will usually be a different distance away. I focus from by pressing AF-ON button which is on the camera, and the AF switch on the camera is always in "C". To recompose, I simply let go of the AF-ON button.​
    I realised after I posted that Nikon's solution is AF-S lenses with manual focus override. I have enough AF-D lenses (and may get more) that I tend to toggle between M and C - occasionally S if the camera is likely to get confused. I still think it would be helpful if this switch was on the other side (along with the ISO button).
     
  19. Actually, it is a D5, with a Leica S2 size sensor.............! Have a sweet dream. I shooting with digital, but some time picking up my F or F2, etc., and heading out with a couple rolls of film. It is fun and very enjoyable, not able to see the image right a way, waiting for the development and get the film to the light table. I figured, it is more expensive to day, then digital, if you like to have a print. Well, not really. How mach do you spend for camera up greet, and computers?
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