DPP 3.7 for linux

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by yakim_peled|1, Sep 16, 2009.

  1. I searched endlessly but was unable to fine it. Can anybody provide a link for download? TIA.
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  2. Do you know a Linux version exists at all? I've never seen nor heard of it.
     
  3. Yakim,
    There is no native Linux version of DPP. Wine is a Windows Emulator for Linux. I've heard it works, but have not tried it myself.
     
  4. “Wine is a Windows Emulator for Linux. I've heard it works, but have not tried it myself.”​
    Sounds like more trouble than it's worth.
     
  5. zml

    zml

    First of all DPP 3.7 is not publicly available on any platform yet. Secondly, there is no native Linux (or any other Unix-ish except Mac) version of DPP AFAIK. Yeah, you can run Windoze emulators on Linux but good luck with that!
     
  6. fjp

    fjp

    I wasn't able to find any version of DPP for Linux, but I've been using UFRaw http://ufraw.sourceforge.net
    to convert RAW files, adjust curves, noise reduction, etc., under Linux.
     
  7. I can testify that some applications run very well on Linux under Wine - I use Picture Windows Pro in this way. Make sure you get a recent version of Wine.
    As an alternative, you can use Bibble (http://www.bibblelabs.com) or LightZone (http://www.lightcrafts.com/lightzone/) for which a native Linux support is available, but you have to pay for them.
     
  8. First of all Wine Is Not an Emulator, hence WINE.
    More importantly, DPP does work in linux using wine, functionally everything works, but there are some display glitches. The display glitches affect the interface only though and doesn't affect the display of the images.
     
  9. I wasn't able to find any version of DPP for Linux, but I've been using UFRaw http://ufraw.sourceforge.net
    to convert RAW files, adjust curves, noise reduction, etc., under Linux.​
    I already installed it but for the life of me I can't use it. It opens the RAW files but I have no idea how to continue from there. I searched for a user manual on the net or a FAQ but couldn't find any. I'm talking about a simple one for the most basic things like: To convert a file to other format click on 'File' and then 'Convert and save' (DPP). What I'm looking is some kind of "UFRaw for dummies" handbook.
    I can testify that some applications run very well on Linux under Wine - I use Picture Windows Pro in this way. Make sure you get a recent version of Wine.​
    Where do I get the latest version of Wine? I have Ubuntu 9.04.

    As an alternative, you can use Bibble (http://www.bibblelabs.com) or LightZone (http://www.lightcrafts.com/lightzone/) for which a native Linux support is available, but you have to pay for them.​
    Before buying I want to make absolutely sure I have exhausted the current options.
    More importantly, DPP does work in linux using wine, functionally everything works, but there are some display glitches. The display glitches affect the interface only though and doesn't affect the display of the images.​
    So how can I install WINE and DPP?
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  10. This is why I still run windows on a couple of my machines. Love linux, but compatability is a problem. Good luck to you.
     
  11. 10X. I think I'll need it. As a matter of fact I knew beforehand that I'll encounter such problems. Now's the time to see who breaks first.
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  12. Yakim, try installing Ubuntu Studio.
    It's specifically geared towards media editing (photo, video, audio).
    Also, use "synaptic" to install WINE. the repos contain relatively new version.
    rubo
    P.S. That's exactly why i can't switch to Linux full-time. I need too many Windows programs for work :)
     
  13. fjp

    fjp

    Hello,
    >> I already installed it but for the life of me I can't use it. It opens the RAW files but I have no idea how to continue from there. I searched for a user manual on the net or a FAQ but couldn't find any. I'm talking about a simple one for the most basic things like: To convert a file to other format click on 'File' and then 'Convert and save' (DPP). What I'm looking is some kind of "UFRaw for dummies" handbook.
    In my copy of UFRaw I just have a "Save" file near the bottom right corner.
    I just press "Save" and it saves a JPEG file with the same name as the original raw file.
    You will also find an Icon with a Hard-Drive drawing, that opens a Tab where you can select the type of output file (8/channel bit JPEG or 16bit/channel TIFF/PNG) and configure all output file settings, like compression, filename, etc.
    You can also choose to generate an "ID" file where it saves all settings you used to convert each RAW file (curves, white-balance, noise reduction, etc.) and later you can convert it again with some small settings changes.
    In my system I have defined UFraw as the default program to open RAW CR2 files.
    Generally I only have to double click on the raw file to open in with UFRaw and in most cases I only need to press the "Save" button to convert the file because it remembers all settings used to on the previous RAW file.
    However, when I'm converting the first file in a batch, I do as following:
    - Open the file.
    - White-Balance/Color correction:
    Check white ballance (First tab) - It lest's you use the color correction values defined by the camera, but you can choose automatic color correction or manual color correction where you select a rectangle on the picture (over a white/gray area of the image).
    You can also correct the colors using direct color temperature values.
    - Correct exposure/highlights/shadows:
    - In case exposer is wrong, you can can correct it and Add/remove up to +/-3EV (+/- Icon) - it even has an auto-correct exposure button.
    - In case you have overexposed, you can choose several methods to clip/recover highlighs (soft/hard/clip/etc.)
    - In case you have underexposed, you also have several methods to recover shadow details.
    It will show blinking highlights and underexposed parts of the image.
    - Noise removal:
    When shotting at high ISO, you can select a wavelet noise filter denoise level (I use it when shoting at ISO >= 3200 on a 5D2)
    - Black and White convertion: if you want to convert to Black and White, the second tab lets you choose several convetion methods: Lightness/Luminance/Value/Channel Mixer.
    Converting to BW using Luminance works very well to remove Chroma noise from high ISO images.
    - Apply curves to correct gama / luminosity and saturation. You can use two curves - one on the base image and other applied later after interpolating colours.
    - Crop and rotate / rescale the image.
    You can also see EXIF data, etc.
    In the end just press "Save".
    There is a mode to batch process many files at once with the same settings, but I never used it.
    Sometimes I later apply some sharpening to the resulting JPEGs using Gimp,
    but can also save the output as a 16 bit TIFF file and edit it using "cinepaint" (a 16 bit gimp version).
    Overall I'm very happy to have found this program as it let's me do all the post-processing using Linux.
    Fernando
     
  14. Many thanks for the detailed explanation. When I get back home (I'm at work now) I'll check it.
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  15. Didn't work. I obviously have a different version. How do I know which? Here is the settings tab.
    00UVob-173419584.jpeg
     
  16. Configuration tab.
    00UVoj-173419784.jpeg
     
  17. If you're looking for a RAW editor in Linux, try Raw Therapee
    http://www.rawtherapee.com/
     
  18. fjp

    fjp

    Hi,
    I'm using UFRaw version 0.15.
    The settings dialog on my system is also empty: it just don't use the settings Dialog :)
    If you look to the scrennshots you just posted, there is row of icons above the "Camera WB" button (below the "+/-" Button).
    When you select these buttons, it will open different "tab" pages, with all the other settings (curves, file settings, crop/resize, EXIF, etc.)
    Fernando
    00UVpR-173425584.jpg
     
  19. And the useless about tab.
    00UVpo-173427584.jpeg
     
  20. But I don't have this tab :-( which is the most important one. I also don't have the 'Save' button below. How can I tell which version I have? How do I update to your version?
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  21. fjp

    fjp

    I've been lookig at the user manual http://ufraw.sourceforge.net/Guide.html
    and it seems UFraw ca be build as two versions/modes: the standalone version that saves files
    and the plugin version that is used inside gimp.
    It seems my version is the standalone version and you are using the gimp plugin version.
    If you call it from inside gimp, it will return the output image back to gimp.
    Fernando
     
  22. I think I have the plugin version as when I double-click a RAW file GIMP opens first and UFRaw opens second. Should I download the standalone version?
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  23. fjp

    fjp

    When you press OK does the image go back to the gimp window ?
    If yes, I guess you can save it inside gimp and apply sharpening, USM, etc.
    Fernando
     
  24. Exactly. So, when I finish with UFRaw I should proceed with GIMP?
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  25. Yakim, you do seem to have the Gimp plugin. Use the standalone version. If you save your image as 16-bit tif, work with it in cinepaint since Gimp can only do 8-bit depth. Cinepaint is much more primitive, but will work with 16 bit tiffs. As far as WINE, you should automatically have the newest version as long as you keep your Ubuntu system uptodate.
     
  26. <!-- @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } -->
    I apologize for my ignorance but what is the difference - in practical terms - between 16-bit and 8-bit? Also, I don't work with TIFF files. When I had the 1D its RAW files ended with .tiff but the RAW files of the 40D ends with .CR2.
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  27. fjp

    fjp

    Exactly. So, when I finish with UFRaw I should proceed with GIMP?
    I think yes.
    JPEG uses 8 bits per colour channel resulting in 256 shades of red, green and blue.
    16bit TIFF uses 16 bits, corresponding to 65536 shades per colour channel.
    However, most camera sensors only generate 12 or 14 bits per pixel, so some of the 16bit bits are not used.
    The computer monitor will only display 8 bit colours, but the remaining bits are used by the computer to avoid loosing details when we apply filters and other image transformations.
    One of the big advantages of having more bits per channel is that it is possible to correct exposure, colour balance, apply gamma curves without loosing too much information.
    In this case, as most of these transformations (gamma curves, exposure and color correction, etc.) are performed inside UFraw using 16bit math, saving the output as a 16 bit image isn't so important, unless when we later want to apply many filters.
     
  28. Apologies. I looked at Wikipedia but still can not understand how TIFF is related. I shoot RAW and convert to JPEG. Where does TIFF play a part here?
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  29. fjp

    fjp

    TIFF is just another image format: It supports both 8bit and 16bit per color channel images,
    as oposed to current JPEG implementations that only support 8 bit images (this might change in the future).
    Some persons prefer to convert RAW to 16bit TIFF.
    They execute all post processing work (filters, sharpening, blur, etc.) using this 16 bit image and only convert the final image to JPEG as a final step in the end.
    http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/digital/raw.html
     
  30. The lossless TIFF compression is a very interesting concept but how much space do you save by going from say, a 10MB RAW file?
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  31. I just saved a fairly detailed TIF using LZW compression from a 10.5MB 1Ds raw file, and it ended up around 19.5MB. The same file using ZIP compression was 17.8MB.
     
  32. I'll keep the RAW format then. I see no reason to transform them to TIFF.
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  33. Another vote for RawTherapee . Good processing, good interface and a lot of control. Don't be put off by the fact that most Canon images come up too dark with the default settings, just adjust the default processing parameters and that's solved. I use it on Windows but many are using it on Linux as well.
     
  34. 10X for the recommendation. I'll give it a try.
    Happy shooting,
    Yakim.
     
  35. fjp

    fjp

    Hello,
    If you are going to compare several programs, please let us know which one worked better.
    I tried several programs one year ago: at the time, I choose UFraw because it was much faster than the other programs (it uses all CPU cores in parallel - if you have a DualDuo or a QuadCore it's a lot faster) but things might have changed since then.
    Fernando
     
  36. Fernando, the key to working fast with RawTherapee (that uses all my CPU's but I only have 2) is using a small preview window(1:4 or 1:5). That's more than adequate to see the effect of color and exposure adjustments. Then use the 'detail' window at 100% or more to check the effect of sharpening and noise reduction. It may not have been the case with you but many people set the preview to 1:1 and are disappointed with the speed.
     

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