DP-3 dumb question

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by james_lai, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. I've just bought a DP-3 finder on the 'bay as an upgrade over my DP-1.
    On the front right bottom corner (when viewed from the nameplate
    side) there is a chrome tab sticking down with a small cylindrical
    tip. What is that for?

    For clarity, I'm not referring to the pin that indexes with the prong
    on the lens. I've checked the MIR site and didn't see any reference
    to this tab -- the best I can figure from the photos there is that
    this tab might have something to do with the DS-2 EE aperture control.
     
  2. That is the release tab for the lens indexing mechanism in the lens aperture follower. If you push straight up on this tab and hold it, you'll find that your aperture ring no longer hits a "detent" at f5.6 and moves a quite a bit easier. It's engaged by the Aperture Servo Unit when you switch the servo to A to reduce the power drain on the motor driving the aperture ring. When you mount a lens with the servo on the camera, pushing the lens release puts the servo in M and disengages this release tab so the lens will index properly.
     
  3. Thanks, Scott! When I posted this question, I had an idea that if anyone knew the answer, it would be you. So, out of curiosity, how did you get to know so much about all things Nikon?
     
  4. Don't know it all, just been using them for over 30 years and have a real passion for the F2, which means the DP-3 is my favorite prism.
     
  5. Scott, many of your posts show a detailed knowledge of the inner workings of the F and F2 -- I thought for sure you were a Nikon engineer or repair guru!

    I get my DP-3 back on Monday (it was reading about 4 stops off so it's in for service). I had always preferred analog needle displays in cameras because they show exactly how far off you are from the meter's suggested exposure, but in testing the DP-3 I found the + o - display very easy to get used to. My DP-1 will probably hit the 'bay once the DP-3 checks out.
     

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