Does Canon's IS work with the a6000 or a7?

Discussion in 'Mirrorless Digital Cameras' started by mark_stephan|2, Nov 25, 2017.

  1. I'm doing some research to figure out what camera to buy. For financial reasons I'm considering the a6000 or a7. I own a few Sony and Minolta A mount lenses which I know will work with adapters. I also own a couple of Canon L lenses with IS. Will the IS function with either body? If not, which one do you recommend? I need IS or SS because I have muscular dystrophy and it's a big aid in keeping the camera steady.
     
  2. I don't know but image stabilization 'IS' works with the Canon M5, M6 and M100 and older Canon lens
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    Last edited: Nov 26, 2017
  3. lately i have seen a lot of a7ii selling for relatively cheap on ebay and the like as many are upgrading to the new models....that might be your best option, as it has an IBIS stabilized body and with an OSS lens you combine both stabilizations up to a theoretical 10 stop stabilization, less in practice but still a lot more than a canon IS....otherwise, the larger the sensor and longer the lens, the more prone to shakes, so maybe look for a stabilized micro 43, some are quite good.
     
  4. "....otherwise, the larger the sensor and longer the lens, the more prone to shakes"

    - This is a common misconception. Sensor or format size has absolutely no effect on camera shake. Whatever geometry you look at (translation, rotation, tilt, etc.) the 'shake' scales absolutely with format provided the lens angle of view remains the same.

    In fact there's some evidence that the greater weight and inertia of a larger camera and lens will damp rapid vibration more so than a less massive camera.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2017
  5. Cameras like the A7 would have stabilization with any lens because the stabilization is in the body. It can not make use of the IS feature on a Canon lens.
     
  6. Nope. The A7 does NOT have in-body stabilization. The A7 II does (5 axis in-body stabilization).
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2017

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