Do you have old cameras that didn't get repaired?

Discussion in 'Casual Photo Conversations' started by RaymondC, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. I have a Mamiya RB67 original model. I guess I got it cheap, I got 2yrs out of it before the holes developed in the bellows and gotten larger, before that I also got some seawater into the focus screen so while it is workable it's not in the best condition.

    So I looked at getting it repaired, $80US for bellow replacements and then possibly $40US to have this installed for me? There is a older guy who has been doing this for some decades. It just doesn't really make sense when you can pick up the latest much newer RB67 Pro SD model with the focus screen in very much excellent condition for maybe $180US ......


    Cheers.

    Edit. I have debated with myself that at least I have a working camera but for $40US more I could have a much newer body and the focus screen isn't affected with salt water and it does not have those rust spots on the metal body. Plus the original model does not have as much interlocks, forget to remove the dark slide - BAM! forget to crank the film mag - BAM! Even if I just buy another Pro SD body and have it sit on my shelf, it will just cost $40US more than having the old one repaired.
     
  2. I would get it fixed, the cost seems reasonable and you are fortunate to know someone who can still do it.
     
  3. Pitch it and get the newer RB. Old beaters often aren't worth the bother when newer models in better shape are available at reasonable prices.
     
  4. If I can't repair it myself I generally sell it.
     
  5. I have a Petri FT 35mm with a 55mm 1.4 lens that is in great shape but the cocking lever is stuck. I bought it at a pawn shop on Okinawa in 1969 when I was in the Marines. I haven't found any place that could fix it so I just keep it as a reminder of the past. I would use the lens if I could find an adaptor for my current Nikon digital camera. I don't know what the lens experts say but I thought the lens was really good.
     
  6. When I was 15 back in 1970, I bought a Nikomat FTn with a 55mm f/1.2 lens with odd job money that I had earned along the way. The fellow that I did some of the work for picked the camera up for me on one of his trips to Japan, so it was a very good price for the time. The light meter has long since stopped working and although I still occasionally use the camera, I never bothered to have it fixed - I suspect I could probably buy another FTn for less than it would cost to repair, but the sentimental value to me is priceless.
     
    tholte likes this.
  7. If I have the Nikkormat FTn I wouldn't use the meter even if it's still working because it takes mercury battery and I wouldn't buy the expensive mercury battery substitute for it.
     
  8. It pays to learn to do the basic stuff yourself. If I couldn't fix things, nothing would work because I'm too poor/cheap to have somebody else do it.
     
  9. I probably wouldn't fix my Petri even if I could. I have a Pentax 67 that I shoot film with and would have a hard time shooting 35mm again.
     
  10. There's a couple of unfixed cameras in shoe boxes hiding under a cabinet somewhere in the house.
     
  11. Not many votes for getting it fixed then. The problem is people who can professionally repair old cameras are getting thinner on the ground by the minute.
     
  12. Bebu, one of the little zinc-air hearing aid batteries can't be shimmed to fit? They are quite cheap although they don't last as long.
     
  13. I usually try a 1.5V PX625 in cameras designed for Mercury batteries. It's surprising how often the exposure readings are OK, or easily compensated by changing the ISO.
     
  14. The only camera I have with a lot of sentimental value is my father's 8mm movie camera. The others I will divest myself of if I can't fix them or will no longer use them, - unless I decide to keep one for parts.

    The most expensive camera I have is worth maybe $400. The next most expensive is worth less than $200. If it's beyond my ability to fix, then it would probably cost more than I'm willing to spend to have somebody else fix it. At that point I'd sell it for parts if I thought it was worth anything at all.
     
  15. Probably 3-4 non operating cameras in my possession. It's cheaper to find a new one than repair the old.
     
  16. "Do you have old cameras that didn't get repaired?"
    I guess you assume "old cameras" are broken and needed to be repaired. I really don't think so. Most of my cameras were purchased used and now they are very old. Yes, many old cameras are broken, but I rarely bought those broken ones. Some "old" cameras that I bought were good when I bought and after a while (really not long) became bad or dead (I threw these away or sold them really cheap). The remained, I do have a lot of very "old cameras" that have never been repaired, and they work as well as new (maybe except the metering system because of batteries and I'm rarely bothered much about it)
     
  17. Are there any trade schools that are looking for donations of old non working cameras to teach camera repair?
     
  18. If the meter doesn't work, but the rest works, is it broken?

    If the shutter speeds are off, but close enough, is it broken?

    Except for some rare cameras, in many cases it is better to find another one than to
    fix the one you have.
     
  19. You can say I am strange but I consider ALL meters in cameras including brand new top cameras are "wrong", not really usable which are equivalent to "broken". Also for shutter speeds and apertures, I consider "correct" means "close enough". But I believe the cameras that I really want to keep have "working" meter because when the meter is really bad or dead, the other parts are also not in very good condition. And No, I don't send any old cameras to repair shop.
     
  20. Meters are much more "mortal" than the gears and other mechanical impedimenta of old film cameras.

    Since film photography today depends to such a high degree on B&W negative and Color Negative media, good old Sunny-16 (LINK) will almost always produce a decent, balanced negative for printing or digitalization.

    As a result, I no longer worry about built-in meter function when acquiring my old "preciouses"
     

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