Dilemma: Canon User with a Nikon 85mm/f1.4

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by clark_king|4, Feb 4, 2010.

  1. Okay first let me say that I am a Canon user because I have always had Canon gear. I have been shooting for about 10 years using formats ranging from 35mm to large format. Now i have a dilema in that I am actually saving for a better Canon camera but have inherited a 85 1.4 lens and only have in my possesion an n90 film camera. I would LOVE to use this lens but want to use it with a digital camera. So what is the least expensive NIkon DSLR that will take advantage of this lens?
    Thank you very much!!
    Clark
     
  2. Looking at currently available bodies (in the lower price class), the D60, D3000 and D5000 have no internal focus motor, which you need for the 85mm 1.4. Then the D90 would be the body of choice.
    Or perhaps go for a second hand D200. Build like a tank, but not as good with the higher isos as the newer D90.
     
  3. get a d50/70/70s. they have a small screen and are a bit slow to preview images but image quality is as good as any other Nikon DX you can get in the store today. I have a D300 but am looking to pick one of these up myself (my old D50 was stolen).
     
  4. gen

    gen

    I'm pretty sure the 85/1.4 is not a "G" lens. It is a D lens, which means that any AF Nikon body should be able to operate it. So you can go with a D40 or D3000.... Of course on DX, it's like a 127.5 or whatever the DX multiplier makes it...
     
  5. I'm pretty sure the 85/1.4 is not a "G" lens. It is a D lens, which means that any AF Nikon body should be able to operate it. So you can go with a D40 or D3000...​
    Gen, the 85/1.4 will not AF on d40/60/3000/5000. Nikon G lenses have no aperture ring, that has nothing to do with a focus motor. the nomenclature for lenses which can AF on lower-end bodies is AF-S.
    Clark, the d200 is a solid body and you can find them cheap used. if you shoot a lot of high ISO, you'll want a d90 instead.
     
  6. I'm pretty sure the 85/1.4 is not a "G" lens. It is a D lens, which means that any AF Nikon body should be able to operate it. So you can go with a D40 or D3000​
    Wrong! As Dennis already made clear, this lens does not have an internal motor, meaning that it is not an AF-S lens, so that it cannot autofocus with bodies such as the D40, D60, D3000, and D5000, which lack the screw drive motor to focus lenses that lack their own motors. That it is a "D" lens is irrelevant.
     
  7. Eric posted just ahead of me -- both posts are listed at the same time. Together with Dennis's answer above, I hope there is no mistake about this.
    Another thought: In choosing between getting a used D200 on the one hand, and a D90 (or used D50 or D70) keep in mind the weight, if you'll be doing a significant amount of shooting hand-held. If you prefer a heavy camera with a heavy lens like the 85 f/1.4, the D200 is a better choice. If you would like the total weight lower, then one of the others would be better. It's up to you, just be aware of it.
     
  8. Buy a Nikon F lens to Canon EOS body adapter. You have to manual focus and the aperture is not automatic, but you can focus at infinity, meter with the EOS body and can even use "A" mode. This set up should be enough to evaluate the optical quality of your 85/1.4 lens at all apertures and distance settings.
     
  9. 85/f1.4 is one of the best Nikon primes and among the top three lenses I like mostly. Its portraiture capabilities are extraordinary, with a unique character and bokeh. I'd encourage you to pair it with a D90.
    I use it in available light, usually at f2... f2.8 and every time I have a hard time to take it out of my camera.
     
  10. The least expensive -and in my opinion very good- solution would be to buy a used D70 (s). The 85 1.4 is a real gem and joy to use and I found out that my old D70 is actually still a very good quality body albeit only in good light situations. Here in the Netherlands they now go for about 150 euros!
    Enjoy!
    Ray
     
  11. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Clark, based on the following previous thread on the Canon EOS Forum, you were contemplating getting a Canon 5D Mark II or 50D last year. I am not sure what you ended up with, but if you already have a higher-end Canon DSLR, it seems to make no sense to add a cheap and/or old Nikon DSLR merely for one lens: http://www.photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00Thds
    There are different versions of the Nikon 85mm/f1.4. E.g. it could be an AF-D version or a manual-focus AI-S, etc. If you would like to use that Nikon lens, the easiest way is to get a Nikon-to-Canon EOS lens mount adapter to mount that Nikon lens onto your Canon cameras. It should work the same way on Canon regardless of whehter it is an AF-D or AI-S. Some of those adapters are better than the others; please search around for additional information. You will only have stop-down metering and may or may not have focus confirmation.
    Or I would suggest selling that Nikon lens and use the money towards other Canon accessories.
     
  12. Clark
    I'm surprised nobody has asked what version of the lens you have which is pertinent information, but I'm with Shun forget buying a Nikon, swapping the lens for a Canon version must be the neastest solution, it makes little sense having a seperate system for 1 lens, I have one I will never sell, so I would suggest swapping not selling
    Steve
     
  13. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I'm surprised nobody has asked what version of the lens you have which is pertinent information​
    Didn't I ask that exact question? Or you are implying that I am nobody? :)
     
  14. Clark, besides what's already been written, there is also another possible way to use this wonderfull lens .... Micro Four Thirts with an adapter for Nikon lenses....
     
  15. You can use the Nikon lens on your cannon with an adapter. Very simple. It will be manual, but will work on any Canon.
     
  16. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Clark, besides what's already been written, there is also another possible way to use this wonderfull lens .... Micro Four Thirts with an adapter for Nikon lenses....​
    That option has several drawbacks:
    • The OP needs to buy yet another camera (unless he already has a 4/3 body).
    • He will have to use an adapter, thus losing functionalities.
    • There will be a 2x crop factor on 4/3. Therefore, the 85mm will be the equivalent of a 170mm on FX, and that is hardly a portrait lens any more.
     
  17. Sell it and put the money towards the canon 85mm f/1.2
     
  18. Oh my gosh, just sell it and put the money towards the Canon. two systems to use one stinkin' lens makes no sense whatsoever.
     
  19. Peter I agree but must point out that the lens is one of the better smelling Nikon lenses :)
     
  20. Okay thank you for all thew discussion!! This an af lens the one that currently retails at bhphotovideo for around 1200. The previous owner purchased it cause he a nice lens for portraits. I have used the lens on n90 film camera and it af's great. I hope this helps clarify thank yall again!!
     
  21. Those are some great suggestion and I really thank all of you very much. I suppose there is a bit of sentimental value even though the previous owner didn't use this lens but maybe on 5 occasions. While he was alive I probably used it more than he. I guess its just time for me to make a decision!! I will look into the adapter option but does that pose any concern for camera body fittment issues and what not? I suppose as mentioned previously the main issues will be with functionality of the lens.
     
  22. "two systems to use one stinkin' lens makes no sense whatsoever." Depends on the lens. In this case, I agree.
     
  23. Shun
    you are most certainly not a nobody apologies I somehow missed your post
    Steve
     
  24. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Steve, I am just kidding. Hope you saw the smiley.
     
  25. Dude, what Abe said 4000 posts ago; buy a cheap Canon to Nikon lens adaptor! I've been a Nikon Film shooter for 15 years. I got a Canon EOS 20D used last Fall. THen I got a cheap ($30) Adaptor and happily use all of my manual and early Autofocus Nikon lenses on that Canon body. Yes, it's manual focus, the way you should be focusing anyway. The Canon even meters at Av and M mode.
    The oft repeated but rarely heeded proverb is; "Nikon is a lens company that also makes cameras, and Canon is a Camera company that also makes lenses." Why not have the best of both worlds?
     
  26. I have little to contribute to this discussion other than to say that it's spelt "dilemma" and not "dilima". It was annoying me
     
  27. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    SD Woods: annoyed no more.
     
  28. As a Canon user, I can tell you that adapting Nikon lenses is pretty painless. Until I got my Canon 200mm f2.8, I regularly used an Ais Nikkor 200 f4 without any problems, as well as an old 5.8cm f1.4 and a 105mm f2.5. Since the 85 is a portrait lens first, I'm betting you'll rarely stop it down past 2.8 or so, in which case the viewfinder will still be plenty bright. You can even get adapters with focus confirmation chips on them nowadays.
     
  29. "So what is the least expensive NIkon DSLR that will take advantage of this lens?"​
    APS-C sensor ('crop factor' = 1.5; effective view of 85mm lens = 127.5mm)
    Cheapest new: D90 (12.3 mp)
    Cheapest used: D50, D70 or D70s (6mp); D80, D200 (10.2 mp)
    Full-frame (same view as 35mm film; effective view of 85mm lens = 85mm)
    Cheapest new or used: D700
    Caution: You might get to liking Nikon behind this...
     
  30. Some random thoughts: [1] yes, you can use a nikon lens on a canon with an adapter. I've done it. However, you have to use "stop-down" metering (at shooting aperture) and the brightness of the screen is non-linear with regard to aperture. Canon lenses have electronics, so the camera "knows" the exact compensation for correct exposure. You may find that you have to apply varying degress of exposure compensation, by trial and error. My Nikon 600 5.6 metered just fine at 5.6 on a canon 20D but at 11 I had to dial in minus two stops! [2] I sold my nikon D70. More recently I have had an opportunity to use a D40 (which will not drive the autofocus motor in your 85.) In my opinion there is NO comparison in image quality. I think Nikon did a tremendous job improving the noise characteristics of the sensor from the D70 to the D40. So, if you are willing to use manual focus, why not a used D40 perhaps with an aftermarket split-image screen? That would give you 1/500 flash synch without the drop in guide number due to the "high speed" synch setting. [3] If you're not concerned about the latest and greatest sensor, and you don't need more than four megapixels or low noise at high ISO, why not consider a used D2H? You should be able to find one for US $ 600 or less and you will have 8 frames/sec, excellent AF and brute force in the AF drive motor. [4] On using two systems for just one lens: in part, it depends on how much you can sell the lens for. Buying an Nikon body may be cheaper than the net cost of trading in for a canon lens.
     
  31. I just receved my ring adapter for the EOS camera to adapt a Nikon lens. Accordingly, I should lose the auto focus and a stop... maybe two... but it was much less expensive than purchasing a camera to keep using one lens. A trade or swap would also be getter than a new system... economically. I am a predominantly Canon shooter. Good luck with your choice(s).
     
  32. Thanks, but.. you got it wrong in the post. Another "m"..
     
  33. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Thanks, but.. you got it wrong in the post. Another "m"..​
    Well, I fixed the title, and that is all I am going to do. They didn't pay me enough to fix every little typo in each post. After all, it wasn't my post; the typo is in the OP's.
     
  34. >>That option has several drawbacks:
    • The OP needs to buy yet another camera (unless he already has a 4/3 body).
    • He will have to use an adapter, thus losing functionalities.
    • There will be a 2x crop factor on 4/3. Therefore, the 85mm will be the equivalent of a 170mm on FX, and that is hardly a portrait lens any more.
    >>
    All true Sheung, but since I like to think "Sideways"( is that how you say this in English ? ) i do have some remarks to that :
    • I understood that the OP asked for another camera suggestion
    • He can get an adapter for almost every lens he can think off ( also the cannon lenses) which opens a lot of new creative possibilities
    • The 85 mm 1.4 becomes a 170 , yes, and its a fantastic one a f1.4 170mm tele ( it works a treat for me ..) is hard to beat. ......
    Of course it cannot replace a good DSLR , but it's al lot of fun, and these micro four thirds are very good for snapshots ( the Olympus Pen II anyways is..).
     
  35. Those are some great suggestion and I really thank all of you very much. I suppose there is a bit of sentimental value even though the previous owner didn't use this lens but maybe on 5 occasions. While he was alive I probably used it more than he. I guess its just time for me to make a decision!! I will look into the adapter option but does that pose any concern for camera body fittment issues and what not? I suppose as mentioned previously the main issues will be with functionality of the lens.
     
  36. Hi Shun,
    I just noticed that I accidently misspelled your name in my last reponse, I'd like to apologiise for this.
     
  37. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    C.P.M. van het Kaar, don't worry about misspelling my name.
    Clark, you can always switch completely over to Nikon. :)
    If that lens has sentimintal value to you, I would just get an adapter to use it on EOS. By no means it is a camera/lens match in haven, but as far as I know it is decent way to work around this problem. Fortunately, I never have any Canon EOS body so that I have no need for such adapter.
     

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