Difference between Japan and Taiwan made cameras

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by nikola_topalov, Nov 30, 2004.

  1. As the beginner Im looking at buying an EOS 300v but the only one I
    found was made in Taiwan. Can anyone please tell me if there is any
    significant difference between the Japan made, and this one. Should I
    continue looking for Japanese Canon, or would the others do the job as
    well as the Japs?
     
  2. Japan employees take more pride in their work, and have better quality control, based on my informal observations.
     
  3. As far as cameras in general go, I'd be more concerned about the name that was on it than the country of origin.

    I believe that "Japs" would generally be considered offensive slang.
     
  4. How dare you say JAPS ! well anyway, I would definiately prefer a japanese made product over the other. at the same price. but if the other is cheaper, then I'll go for the other.
     
  5. Considering that these cameras are made using automated, computer-controlled machinery, and are not hand-crafted by mastersmiths over open fires, I don't really think where the machinery is located is too important.

    Where do you think the microprocessors in most of the world's computers are made? Where do you think the various sensors inside your "Made in Japan" camera are made? Where do you think a lot of the parts of your "Made in America" or "Made in Germany" car were made? If you picked a developing country, you are correct.

    The days where country of manufacture made a difference in quality are gone. Certainly goods made in, say, China for Chinese customers will not tend to be as high quality as goods made in Japan for Japanese customers. But this is because the former is made to a price point that is much lower, not because China is incapable of making high quality products. If Canon were to set up a manufacturing plan in Taiwan, you can be sure they'd install the appropriate QC processes.

    I've worked extensively as a consultant in SE/S Asia for US/European companies that have set up manufacturing hubs there, and in this one case atleast, I can claim to be somewhat of an expert on the subject at hand.

    Vandit
     
  6. I'm old enough to remember when "Made in Japan" literally meant.....a piece of junk.

    My how time change.
     
  7. >>I'm old enough to remember when "Made in Japan" literally meant.....a piece of junk.<<

    if at first you don't succeed...etc...etc...
     
  8. I`ve read that all pro cameras will still be made in Japan, and all other models will now come from Taiwan. Many supplers offer extended warrentees not sure if its worth it but camera dont last these days so you`ll probably get a new model in 2~3 years anyway. My old 500C still works as good today I`ve had it over 30 years dont think my DSLR`s will lasta as long

    Have fun
     
  9. Back in the day--when I was a young upstart--calling a Japanese a Jap was fightin' words. It still is here in Honolulu. Jap is generally regarded in the same light as a White or Asian using the "N" word.

    Here's my experience with Japanese vs Taiwanese made Elan 7 bodies: my Japan made Elan 7E is perfect in fit and finish whereas my Taiwanese made Elan 7NE is a level below the Japan model in terms of QC. The 7NE's popup flash is slight off alignment, the illuminaton of the focusing rectangles is uneven and faint and the focusing screen had dust (between screen and pentaprism) and a tiny scratch on it. Both work equally well. I heard similar comments from other 7N owners. Given the choice, I'd get the Japanese made model but you won't go wrong with the Taiwanese made model.
     
  10. The newspaper headlines during WW2 were filled with "Japs" and "Nips" in the headline titles. The contractions were done to save space; make a shorter; bigger headline; with simple short words. When alot of your neighbors got killed off; and never came back; one didnt have the time to worry about the 60 year later backlast to the shorted words; considered proper at the time. If folks worried about petty stuff during WW2; the USA would be speaking Japanese and German. The Japanese I worked with in Japan used the term "Japs" among themselves. It is not offensive to all people; not even to many Japanese.
     
  11. WWII was 59 years ago and a lot has changed. Most Japanese nationals aren't offended by
    Jap because they don't understand the cultural context. However, most Japanese
    Americans don't take kindly to the use of Nip or Jap by those outside their ethnic group.
    Where I grew up I was hassled daily because of my race and hated being called a Jap, Guk
    or Chink. Apparently the name callers thought all three words meant the same thing. Most
    Asian Americans consider these words to be racial slurs whether the user meant it that
    way or not.
     
  12. "The 7NE's popup flash is slight off alignment"

    Funny to say that, my ex-EOS 300 (european name for Rebel 2000) was Japanese made and had the popup flash flushed correctly with the body when closed. My girlfriend's Taiwanese Rebel 2000 pops off the top a bit when closed.

    In general, I hardly ever bother checking where something is made, in all likelihood it is Taiwan and if it is not, most of the components inside are Taiwanese.
     
  13. Kelly, my African American friends use the N word amongst themselves but please do NOT tell me that 'Nigger' isn't offensive.
     
  14. OT, but can anyone tell me why a Taiwanese made camera bought here in Taiwan (where I currently live) costs more than the same camera would in the US?
     
  15. and why is it the eos 55 I got in japan costed more than the ElanIIeQD in the US back then ?
     
  16. Considering that these cameras are made using automated, computer-controlled machinery, and are not hand-crafted by mastersmiths over open fires, I don't really think where the machinery is located is too important.
    Considering these machines are loaded by human beings in the country they are located, and usually programmed by human beings in the country they are located, I'd not be too quick to deem country of manufacture irrelevent.
    The days where country of manufacture made a difference in quality are gone.
    Beautiful theory, one the major manufacturers are very pleased to have you believe, but incorrect. Honda's made in Japan are better than Honda's assembled in the USA. Volkswagens made in Germany are better than Volkswagens made in China or Brazil. If you don't believe it, I suggest you go to China and look at the quality of the Volkswagens or Lexusses manufactured and sold there.
    I can claim to be somewhat of an expert on the subject at hand.
    Based on the incorrect conclusions you've presented, I can claim that you're expertise is overrated.
    I'm old enough to remember when "Made in Japan" literally meant.....a piece of junk.
    I can too. Made in Japan when I was a kid was akin to made in China today: junk. (There are some exceptions--I have two sony televisions made in China, and they seem to be a high quality exception to Chinese equating to junk). China is moving ahead, but they are not yet at their apex of quality. I expect they will in the next 5 to 10 years, but not yet.
    My wife is from China, and even she realizes what the so-called self-proclaimed expert Vandit Kalia doesn't--that country of manufacture or final assembly makes a difference. She still holds irrational hatred for the country of Japan for Japan's invasion of Manchuria, but she, and every Chinese person I know, including many in China, would much rather have a camera made in Japan than in Mainland China or Taiwan. I have been specifically warned to "make sure the camera was made in Japan" when picking up a camera for a friend in China.
     
  17. Wow, that's quite a vitriolic reaction to a differing opinion.

    My opinion is based on working with clients who have gone on to set up manufacturing bases in China, Indonesia, India and Thailand, to name a few. In every case that I have worked on, QC - in terms of overall MTTF/MTBF as well as %defects - has been statistically identical *for the same design parameters*

    I'm merely offering Believe what you will - stick to your broad generalizations about Taiwanese being somehow "less capable" of operating machinery that is virtually fully automated, if it pleases you.

    Hell, buy handcrafted cameras, if it makes you happy.. doesn't really affect my life any.

    Cheers,
    Vandit
     
  18. Oh and btw - your wife being Chinese doesnt make her an expert on quality control/production issues.

    I am ethnically Indian, and I know that lots of Indians share her opinions - they prefer to buy foreign products b/c they perceive them as being better. That is because historically (and even now), a vast majority Indian products were made to a partiular price point, and QC was sacrificed. As such, those perceptions still exist. That doesn't mean that the automotive parts made in India that go into various US and European cars are of any less quality (India is a global hub for parts for Ford; BMW and VW are also setting up manufacturing hubs here).

    But hey, what do I know? I simply have work experience on this subject and don't have the benefit of a Chinese wife to tell me how things really are.

    Cheers,
    Vandit
     
  19. OK, indians aside and chinese wives aside, Here comes an opinion from AN ACTUAL CHINESE PERSON !

    Made in what country dont really matter. It is the specific plants that does the manufacturing that does matter.

    Stuff that is made in a poor country for it's own internal markets are inferior to the stuff made by outside companies for export to first world markets.

    The quality of the stuff made in third world countries such as cambodia for import to the USA vs the same stuff made IN the USA will be slightly inferior due to the lack of quality outside the factory boundaries.

    China and Taiwan are not third world countries so the quality of the said goods are very similar or equal.

    In japan where I once worked at a Denki, ( electronics store ) the goods made in Japan Costed more than the same goods made in the other countries. I am talking about the same make and model. Reason being the japanese people are paid more to do their jobs than other countries. For example, a mcdonalds worker:

    Japan : 10 US dollars an hour
    USA : 6 US dollars an hour
    CHINA : 50 cents an hour
    Vietnam : They dont even HAVE a mcdonalds

    Oh and by the way, the food in the china mcdonalds are the same price as it is here in the USA and EATING in a mcdonalds is a status symbol of wealth ! you see teenage kids hanging out in mcdonalds all sharing one bag of fries, some arent even eating anything and just sitting there to look cool.
     
  20. Ultimately, it boils down to this: if buying a "Made in XXX" product makes you feel better, by all means go ahead and do so! It is your money, and you should spend it the way that gives you peace of mind.

    Although then we wouldnt have these absurdly entertaining side discussions, would we?

    Vandit
     
  21. Oh and by the way, the food in the china mcdonalds are the same price as it is here in the USA and EATING in a mcdonalds is a status symbol of wealth !
    And the McDonalds in China have french fries that taste different and worse than the USA, as well as Hamburgers that taste awful.
    However, bottled coke tastes better in China than in the U.S. because sugar is cheaper in China than corn syrup, and sugar tastes better.
    Still, Hondas made in the U.S. are inferior when it comes to workmanship (e.g., putting the dashboard or seat molding together).
     
  22. Oh and btw - your wife being Chinese doesnt make her an expert on quality control/production issues.
    Never said it does. But she is a discerning consumer. Large corporations might do well to pay attention to such people.
     
  23. The main difference in manufacturing quality would be the quality control during and at the end of the process.

    I think most people have heard the story about the (Japanese) Toyota worker who - on his way home from the plant - stops if he sees a Toyota with a crooked windshield wiper and adjusts it, because he can not *stand* to see a Toyota with a crooked windshield wiper. (If it ain't true, it's at least well invented ;-)

    The same camera that might go back to final assembly for re-adjustment in Japan might just be put into the box in other countries, because the quality people accept maybe a little more.

    Still ... I think that most P&S digital cameras are assembled in China, nowadays.

    Best regards,
    Andy
     

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