developing film

Discussion in 'Black and White' started by ben_albrecht, Apr 24, 2002.

  1. i have been doing photography at school and i wanted to get started in my own time, and i need to know what sort of chemicals to use, and if there are any certain temperatures need for the chemicals
     
  2. Well, Ben, you could start off using the same film, chemicals,
    processing times and temperatures that you use as school. You could
    also ask your photo teacher for suggestions.

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    The reason I answer this way, is you do not specify black and white,
    color, whether you are doing prints or transparencies or your plans
    for the resulting images.

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    This is a good forum with a lot of knowedgable people, but we need
    some more information if we are to give you some help.
     
  3. Ben,

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    I assume you are using black and white film. A great way to start out
    is by using a film developer called Diafine. It is made by Acufine.
    This developer is a 2 bath, which is very versatile. You develop your
    film for 3 minutes in the first bath, and 3 minutes in the second
    bath. No rinse in between. It does not matter what the temperature
    is, between reasonable limits. You can also develop two different
    rolls of film at the same time! Negatives come out great, and you
    don't have to worry about precise time and temperature measurements.
    I started using this developer when I was very young, and have
    recently started using it again. It is a great developer, especially
    if you are shooting outdoors and there is a wide range of light from
    dark to bright.

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    For stop bath, you can use an indicator stop bath, or just a water
    rinse. These are available from Kodak, Clayton, Nacco, and others. It
    will turn purple when it is exhausted.

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    For fixer, I recommend a rapid fix. Liquid (easy to mix) versions are
    available from Ilford, Clayton, Arista, Nacco, and others. Powder
    fixers are also available from Kodak.

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    You can also use a hypo clearing agent to speed the wash cycle. Try
    Kodak Hypo Clearing Agent, Heico Perma Wash, Zonal Pro Archival
    Rinse, or Orbit bath.

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    Once washed, dip your negatives in Kodak Photo Flo.

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    I hope this helps.
     

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