D850 photo hazy and blurry

Discussion in 'Beginner Questions' started by jiwooseok, Sep 18, 2020.

  1. There you go!
    Window glass is not optical quality.
     
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  2. That tripod looks like a copy of the "3-legged Thing" design. I was reasonably impressed with the 3-legged thing after a brief examination of one at a trade show. Vibration was very well damped.

    Not impressed enough to actually buy one though. My Manfrotto and Gitzo collection of tripods do all I need (they're one and the same company now).

    I wouldn't call $100 exactly cheap for a basic aluminium tripod. It's going to be a darn sight better than hand-holding... provided the right technique is used. That means using mirror-up and the self-timer or a remote release. But a windy day or a passing truck can ruin sharpness even then.

    Or the aforementioned temperature interface turbulence.
    Sharp2.jpg
    Blurred2.jpg
    There was no difference in shooting conditions between the above two shots - 15 metres distance, hefty studio tripod, focus locked, etc. Except I could actually see air ripples passing across the subject through the viewfinder in the less sharp shot.

    This happened repeatedly and regularly while shooting through an open doorway. If I moved the camera completely outside the rippling went away.

    Lens was a 400mm IF-ED Nikkor that's capable of pretty good sharpness. When air quality allows!
     
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  3. If you aren't shooting video, you don't need a fluid head. You should get a good ball head with a separate panning lock.

    Decent tripods and heads are expensive. Excellent tripods and heads are very, very expensive. I make do with decent.

    As a general rule, larger balls mean smoother action, and larger ball heads support more weight. However, within any size, there are variations in quality. I use a small ballhead, a Markins, with equipment as heavy or heavier than yours--a Canon 5D Mark IV with an EF 100-400L (a beast of a lens). I think a bigger head of comparable quality would be better, but this suffices, and with my old and damaged back, I don't want anything heavier. However, this alone, without a tripod, is about $300. You can buy adequate ballheads for less from companies like Benro at any good photo retailer. I haven't shopped in years, but I suspect you can find decent ones for roughly $100-150.
     
  4. That's like saying Ferrari and Alfa are the same company - just because they belong to the same FCA group. Different brands, same parent (Vitec). Didn't know that Sachtler is also part of Vitec group, as is LowePro.
    Those techniques are fine for static subjects - but totally impractical when it comes to shooting anything that moves. As is a ballhead - with the exception of the already mentioned Flexshooter. Some ballheads can be used as a gimbal - that works in a pinch put isn't a good substitute for everyday use.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2020
  5. Well, they'll both get you from A to B, and quite honestly I find very little difference in stability between Gitzo and Manfrotto tripods of a similar size and weight. Basically 3 legs with a threaded platform on top.
     

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