D-5100 v, D7000

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by richard_dulkin, Oct 30, 2011.

  1. Currently I own a D90. Happy with it. It is used EXCLUSIVELY for indoor studio work as I am handicapped and can't balance unless I am sitting. I shoot female models using strobe lights which are set off with a Wein Infrared transmitter to receiver triggers and slaves. I also use many sb600 strobes with the commander 800 unit. Virtually all my work is done like this. My lens line up is: (All Nikkor) 10-24mm f/3.5-4 ED, 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR, 35mm f1.8G, 50mm f/1.8G, 80-200mm f/2.8 G ED, 105mm f/2.8 IF ED micro. I want to add in the future 24-70mm f/2.8 ED. That will be the final lens (my wife says there is no such thing as a final lens). Now the Question: I would like to add either the D5100 or the D7000 (there is close to a 2x price difference factor between the two. It is the 16mm sensor I am after for the 35mm, the 50mm, and the future 24-70. I don't need the extra card slot, not a factor. I am working with my D90 just fine so the extra titanium frame does not impress me. Will the D-5100 perform at the same mechanical, electrical, strobe trigger levels, and accept all the lenses I have currently as well as the future one, as the D90? BTW, all my shoots are taken in the Manuel mode 1/200 sec. at f/10-11-13 so even the meter reading ability is not a factor. The Auto focus would be a factor. I do not charge for my work and do it purely for enjoyment, I am not in business.
    What say you one an all, be specific as to the reasons you feel one is better than the other within the parameters I have laid out. Thanks
    Richard
     
  2. Since you have the SB800 and the flash commander, you don't need the D7000's ability to BE a commander for those other flashes, which I don't think the D5100 can do.
    I understand the D5100 has the same sensor as the D7000, so that's a wash.
    You shoot in a staged environment, so the higher number of AF points may not matter.
    You don't have any MF lenses, so that ability of the D7000 is not a bonus for you.
    You don't need the better weather sealing either.
    On the surface, I would say you could save your money and go with the D5100. I'll wait for the other guys who shoot flash and do studio work to chime in, to be sure.
     
  3. I'm not so much a flash and studio guy, but I started in digital with a D40, and added a D100 when some older AF lenses became available. Now I have the D7000 which can use all types. The D40 is relegated to using the Pre AI lenses I will keep that way and the "kit" lenses that came with it.
    Are all the lenses you have the AF-S type? I have trouble keeping track. If they work from the screw drive system, the 5100 wont help.
    Otherwise, you have a very smart wife.
    -Peter
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    80-200mm f/2.8 G ED, 105mm f/2.8 IF ED micro​
    There is no Nikon 80-200mm/f2.8 G lens. There are three different AF versions that use "screwdriver" AF and the last version was AF-S; all four have aperture rings. Unless you have the AF-S version, there is no AF on the D5100. And if your 105mm/f2.8 ED micro is not the current AF-S version, there is also no AF on the D5100.
    The D90 and D7000's pop-up flash can be the Nikon CLS flash master; the pop-up flash on the D5100 cannot.
    The D5100 has the same AF module as the D90; the D7000 has much better AF. The D5100 has a penta mirror viewfinder that is inferior to that on the D90.
    Otherwise, the D5100 seems to be good enough for the OP. I would suggest looking thru the D5100's viewfinder and play with its single command dial to make sure that you are happy enough with it. Keep in mind that you may lose AF on some of your lenses.
     
  5. "You don't have any MF lenses," - as Shun explained, most of your lenses are mechanical shaft screwdriver AF type, and will not autofocus on D5100.
     
  6. most of your lenses are mechanical shaft screwdriver AF type, and will not autofocus on D5100.​
    All but one are AF-S lenses, and all but one will AF on a D5100. The odd lens out, as Shun pointed out, doesn't exist. If the OP meant an 80-200 AF-D lens, it's screw drive and he'd need to get a D7000 to have AF with that lens. If it's a 70-200 f/2.8 G lens, it's AF-S and will AF just fine with the D5100. Except for the mystery lens, he'd be ahead to get the D5100.
    The thing I can't figure is why anyone with an DX camera would want a 24-70/2.8 zoom. If I didn't have a D700 (as well as a D7000), I wouldn't own one. The equivalent DX angles of view are covered with a 17-55/2.8 DX lens. The focal range of 24-70mm is somewhat awkward on DX, but then it might suit the OP's application.
     
  7. What is the reason you are seeking a 2nd body? Is a specific feature you need on the D5100 or D7000 that your D90 is lacking? If so, which one?
     
  8. I also want to know why you're buying the big heavy 24-70 that is not suited for DX (in my opinion and, it seems, most DX shooters) instead of a 17/18-50/55 f2.8 DX zoom. The 24-70 isn't a great match for a DX camera, for most people, unless perhaps they are ABOUT to upgrade to FX. obviously, ymmv...
    As a fellow D90 user, I'd get the D7000 myself, as I find that the additional thumb-wheel, the top display, and the general layout are things I've gotten so used to that the D5100 would never suit me.
     
  9. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    In his opening post, the OP wrote:
    It is the 16mm sensor I am after for the 35mm, the 50mm, and the future 24-70.​
    I assume he wants the 16MP sensor. Whether that is a "good" reason or not is totally up the person who spends the money to decide. In a studio setting, most likely high-ISO won't matter much, but the D7000/D5100 do have an ISO 100 option.
    The 24-70mm/f2.8 AF-S lens can work very well as a portrait lens on DX, but that seems to be a very expensive way to achieve such results.
    My lens line up is: (All Nikkor) 10-24mm f/3.5-4 ED, 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR, 35mm f1.8G, 50mm f/1.8G, 80-200mm f/2.8 G ED, 105mm f/2.8 IF ED micro.​
    1. There is only one flavor of the 10-24, it is a DX wide with AF-S.
    2. The 18-105 is also a DX AF-S.
    3. So is the 35mm/f1.8.
    4. The G version of the 50mm/f1.8 is AF-S.
    5. There is no Nikon 80-200mm/f2.8 G. If we are talking about the 70-200mm/f2.8, both versions are G, VR, and AF-S. If we are talking about a 80-200mm/f2.8, only the last version is AF-S.
    6. The 105mm/f2.8 comes in AF, AF-D and AF-S flavors. It is not clear which one the OP has.
     
  10. This is a no brainer. Among DX format cameras, the D7000 is King. I have owned this camera for almost a year now and I can't believe the value Nikon has packed into it for the price. Stop thinking about comparrison's, because right now the D7000 has no equal in the DX world. It is the top of the line, state of the art.
     
  11. Richard, as long as your lenses are all AF-S, as others have mentioned, you might as well just get the D5100. If you're using the SB800 on the camera to control the SB600's, you'll be fine. The only thing is you'll be using the SB800's screen to control your flashes, because I don't think that the D5100 has the menu for it. However, I don't think you will need the 24-70mm lens. If you are shooting f/8 or smaller, you aren't going to see an image quality difference between the 18-105mm lens and the 24-70mm lens in color, sharpness, vignetting, etc. As long as you have software (like CaptureNX or Lightroom) that automatically corrects for distortion and aberrations for specific lenses, then the only difference with the 24-70mm lens is that you'll have a heavier camera and a lighter wallet.
    Peter, if you are working with models in the studio, many people would not need to go wider than 24mm on a DX camera. Many would prefer the addition portrait range of 55-70mm on a lens than having the never-used-for-models-because-they'd-slap-you-for-distorting-them 17-24mm range. Also, the pro-grade zoom lens before the 24-70 was the 28-70, and before that, it was a 35-70. So, if a 35-70 was good enough for professionals with 35mm film 10 years ago, why is the equivalent 36-105mm on a DX body suddenly a sacrilege? The OP knows how to use a camera, and he knows focal lengths well enough that he should be allowed to make whatever lens choice that he wants. Plus, if he does need wide angle for some specific setup, he has the 10-24mm already. Since he's in a studio, there is no chance of missed shots.
    Donald, the D5100 uses the same sensor, and therefore, given the same exposure and same lens, will take the same photo as the D7000. If you aren't using features like the Commander mode, Ai lens meter, mirror lockup, etc. then you're just paying more for nothing.
     
  12. The 105mm/f2.8 comes in AF, AF-D and AF-S flavors. It is not clear which one the OP has.​
    The OP has a "105mm f/2.8 IF ED micro", only the current AF-S VR model is IF with ED glass, so all his lenses are AF-S (with the possible exception of the 80-200).
     
  13. The D5100 body is much smaller than the D90 so the grip is different - some would say not optimal with the 80-200 or similar heavier lenses. Nikon doesn't make a battery grip for the D5100 either and the battery runs out faster than on the D90. The viewfinder is also smaller than the D90. The D5100 also has more shutter lag so if you try to catch movement you will it harder. Because of the swivel LCD buttons are not on the left as the D90 so the user interface is different.
    When it comes to handling and performance the D5100 is mostly a downgrade compared to the D90 while the D7000 is an upgrade compared to the D90. D5100 and D7000 share the same image quality though.
    D5100 versus D7000 is kind of the same thing as in the old days of film. All cameras had the same image quality with the same film and optics but viewfinders, handling, size and features where different.
    Best course of action would be to borrow a D5100 and see if you can live with it. If you can then you have saved yourself some cash.
     
  14. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Roland, of course you are absolutely right that only the AF-S VR version of the 105mm/f2.8 micro has ED elements. I should know since I have both that and the 105mm/f2.8 AF version, right in front of me.
    However, I would like to see the OP verify which lenses of his are AF-S.
    I wouldn't necessarily say the D7000 and D5100 have the same image quality. While the sensors must be very similar, AF speed and accuracy also plays a major role in terms of image quality, so is frame rate.
    The D5100 uses a much smaller battery, which clearly won't last as long. But since we are talking about an indoor studio setting, a lot of these factors might not be as critical.
     
  15. Shun, the sensors are more than "very similar." They are more along the lines of "exactly identical." The price difference of the D7000 comes from the better body, more controls, more features, weathersealing, meter that works with all lenses (even pre-autofocus), better autofocus system, etc. Of course if you focus the shot differently, the image quality will be different. If you're shooting sports then there are advantages to the D7000. But, for shots within the limits of both cameras, if you focus on the same object, and use the same exposure, with the same lens, then the images will be exactly the same. The OP is working in the studio, so there is no worry about misfocus or framerate.
     
  16. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Ariel, the D7000 can shoot 6 frames/second while the D5100 is max 4 frames/second. Without taking those cameras apart and inspect the sensors myself or getting reliable information about that from Nikon, I would rather not make the claim that they are identical sensors.
    In the case of the D300 and D90, both are 12MP CMOS sensors. However, the D300 can shoot 8 frames/second instead of 4.5 for the D90 because the D300's sensor has 4 channels for faster data readout while the D90's sensor has only 2 channels. Those sensors are very similar and produce similar results, but they are not identical.
     
  17. Shun, the fps is based on the camera's shutter and electronics/processor surrounding the sensor, which is independent of the sensor. It is clear from peoples' experience, plus the knowledge of the D7000's and D5100's performance, that the sensor is exactly the same. As I said, there are ergonomic and feature advantages to the D7000, but if you take both cameras, put the same lens on them, focus that lens to the same subject, and choose the same exposure, then both cameras will make an identical image. If any of the handling features, such as higher framerate, mirror lockup, more on-body controls, etc. are important to you, get the D7000. For our OP, who sits and shoots in a controlled environment, or anyone else that doesn't need the features of the D7000, there is no reason to spend the extra money on one.
    http://www.chipworks.com/en/technical-competitive-analysis/resources/recent-teardowns/2011/01/teardown-of-the-panasonic-lumix-gh2/
    http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Publications/DxOMark-Reviews/Nikon-D5100-DxOMark-Review/Nikon-D5100-vs-Nikon-D7000-same-sensor-same-results
     
  18. I read somewhere that the photo processing between the two may be different even though the sensors are the same. Whether that's for JPEG only or for RAW too, I don't know.
    If I may add a question, can anyone comment on their experiences with the articulating LCD on the D5100 when used in Landscape photography? Can someone confirm that the D5100 does or does not have mirror lockup to reduce shake? What about the D7000?
     
  19. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Both the D7000 and D5100 have the one-second exposure delay mode. I use that to eliminate effects from the mirror slap.
     
  20. Do the delays work in bracket mode? Can you lock the mirror, see through the LCD in live view and then adjust focus and exposure manually? In effect, taking the mirror out of the picture totally?
     

Share This Page

1111