Characteristics of the 90/2 ASPH and 75/1.4

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by scott_g|2, Jul 4, 2001.

  1. I am considering switching from a late production 90/2.8 lens to one of these two. I find that I am using my 90 much more than I initially thought I ever would. Since I shoot slow speed film and available light I think I can take advantage of the extra stops offered with these lenses.

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    If you have any experience or opinion about these lenses, that would help with my decision, please let me know.

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    Thanks and Happy Fourth of July to all you fellow Yanks!

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    Scott
     
  2. IMO, the only lens worth switching the current 90/2.8 for would be
    the 90/2 APO. The performance of the non-APO 90/2 at f2 and 2.8 is
    of noticeably less contrast and edge sharpness than the 90/2.8.
    Ditto for the 75 Summilux until f/4. I had both of these lenses and
    sold them. The 75 is also extremely heavy and bulky, slow and stiff
    to focus, blocks a lot of the finder frame, and has so little DOF
    wide open that it was practically useless to me on the rangefinder
    camera. I wouldn't think of switching from my 90/2.8 until I'd maxed
    out on Portra 800 and still felt lacking for another stop. I carry a
    small table tripod and Portra 800 and have gotten great images at
    quite slow speeds with the Elmarit. For handholding I use the 35/1.4
    ASPH which actually has enough DOF wide open to be useful.
     
  3. I agree with Jay on holding onto the 90 2.8 Elmarit-M if you can make
    it work with a higher speed film that you like. The 800 ISO Fuji
    Superia (with the 4th color layer) is really good stuff and lets me
    handhold at 1/60 sec in some dimmer settings. As a side benefit of
    the Elmarit-M, even though I shoot with the 0.85 finder I feel much
    more comfortable having the more generous depth of field which 2.8
    gives me over a faster aperture at this focal length. I have a 85mm
    1.8 Nikkor and wide open dof can be very shallow.

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    Doug from Tumwater
     
  4. I recommend you hold on to the elmarit. I own the elmarit, the 75 lux
    and the 90 apo and all are excellent lenses. For portrait work, I
    find the apo much too contrasty and sharp. If you want a lens for low
    light work, the extra stop of the lux is probably the answer.
    Consider that even wide open, the lux will give you an excellent
    8X10.Wide open, portraits with the lux have a rich tonality and the
    backgrounds totally disappear.
    The apo beats the lux at F2, after that and using a 40x Zeiss
    microspcope, I can not discern any resolution advantage to either
    lens. On the other hand, the elmarit has some of the most impressive
    out of focus rendition, the apo's bokeh is not as well behaved. The
    lux, has a creaminess and roundness which I also like. In short, for
    portraits the elmarit, for landscape with slow high res. films the
    apo, for low light work and portraits with no DOF the lux.
     
  5. I have the 90 AA and the 75. I find I don't use the 75 nearly as
    much as I thought I would. It's big, heavy, balances poorly on the
    body, the focus ring is stuff and I find the frame lines very hard to
    work with.

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    The 90AA is a killer lens in all respects save one. The 75 used
    around f/2.8 has the most gorgeous tonality I've ever seen in a Leica
    lens. That alone keeps it in my bag. But for all-out resolution,
    contrast, colour saturation etc. the 90 is virtually unbeatable. I
    have some shots done hand-held, wide open in a club under stage
    lighting on Provia 400F that are breathtakingly good.

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    While I agree that you can go a long way by maxing out film speed and
    sticking with the Elmarit, my guess is that after one roll though the
    90AA you'd be hooked.
     
  6. Ditto most of the above. I use the 90AA wide open a lot for low light
    work, and the hand-held results with Portra 400 are stunning. And
    unless you find yourself wanting the extra stop frequently, I would
    do as Jay suggests, and achieve it on those occasions you do want it
    by going up to Portra 800. Your current 90 is a great performer, and
    is lighter and smaller than the 90AA. But, if you want f2 a lot of
    the time, you will love the 90AA!
     

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