Canon 70-200 f2.8 IS II price

Discussion in 'Canon EOS' started by paul_h., Apr 11, 2010.

  1. Hi all,

    I've more or less talked myself into the 2.8 70-200. I don't know much about how Canon prices typically behave so is the $2499 what the
    long term price of the mark II version this lens should be? Or will it settle down closer to the $1800 of the old model? If the price is
    expected to go down to some lower level how long does that normally take?
     
  2. "Or will it settle down closer to the $1800 of the old model?" - No way, no how. The Mk I is no slouch. Save some money and get one.
     
  3. new lenses often drop somewhat in price after several months. The 100mmL macro was selling at list (1049, if I recall) virtually everywhere when it was new. It is now $949 at B&H.
     
  4. Get it NOW, this way you can show us some sample :) I have the mark 1 and it's by far the best lens I have, and I have lots. Get it and enjoy it and don't look back. V/R Buffdr
     
  5. My guess is that it will settle down in price somewhat, but probably not more than a hundred or two from where it's at now. There's also the exchange rate factor... if the Dollar tanks against the Yen you would see price increases, not decreases.
     
  6. the only way prices will go down is if you buy used in a year. Otherwise, new prices just tend to go in one direction, up. Find a magazine from about a year ago with the BH catalog in the back and compare lens prices with current ones.
     
  7. canon lens prices dont go down, unless a newer better version of a current lens comes out. So this price would go down if they made a III. wait a few months for a used one to pop up, although that would make me wonder why someone would want to sell such a lens.
     
  8. Consensus is correct. Look at other L lenses and compare selling prices to list prices on B&H, Adorama, etc. Maybe it comes down $150 or so, maybe a bit better with a rebate some day, but its not going to drift downwards to Mk I levels.
     
  9. It depends on the law of supply and demand. If you need the lens today, buy it; otherwise, wait. Will the price go up or down? No one knows. I bought the 5D II on Jan 27, 2009 at $2699. Today is $2499. Are 14 months of pictures worth $200? You tell me.
     
  10. If you are not in a hurry, wait. Maybe the next series of rebates will knock a couple of hundred dollars off. Otherwise, as a last resort, rent.
    Here is an example of rental prices in Canadian dollars http://www.vistek.ca/rentals/details/R303630/rental-details.aspx.
     
  11. If you decide to save your money and get the MkI, GET IT NOW! When it sells out completely it will be gone, no more production of the MkI! I had to look several places to find mine, but did and am in love! :) You will love the MkI it is hands down my favorite lens I use it 80-90% of the time!
     
  12. Thanks for all the responses guys. I just wanted to make sure that it wasn't going to be showing up for a little bit more then I would pay for a mark I right now. Obviously it's not which is really all I needed to know.
    Just picked up a used I for $1k less then the new II. So its done. :^)
     
  13. Generally I never buy a lens that has just hit the market. You need to give it at least a year or two to let the market reach saturation. A good website to monitor prices is http://www.photoprice.ca/ so you can judge what is fair. I noticed in Canada our prices fluctuate a lot and prices go down when our dollar is strong. It can take around 1 to 2 quarters of a year to see the prices change at a local dealer. Canon rebates are a good way to save as well. Especially since in Canada the rebate often gets applied at point of sale.
    One other thing is dealers can lower the price of the lens for you if you are willing to bargain. There is plenty of room in lens prices but you have to not take the first no and also do your research. Both my L lens were bought from Henrys and I got them to match and beat the competitors.
     
  14. I know the OP bought a lens already, but it's still an interesting question.
    Randy wrote:
    "Generally I never buy a lens that has just hit the market. You need to give it at least a year or two to let the market reach saturation."​
    Philip wrote:
    "I bought the 5D II on Jan 27, 2009 at $2699. Today is $2499. Are 14 months of pictures worth $200? You tell me."​
    Who's right? Both are (though I think more like Philip).
    It depends on how much you expect to use the lens between now to when it drops $100-$200 and how much that money means to you. $200 is no trifle, but when it represents less than 10% of the cost of an item, it can seem like self-punishment to wait a year or two to save that much.
     
  15. Phillip is talking about a body though. Bodies get updated much more often and new technology comes out all the time, driving the prices of bodies down regularly. Lenses do not do this. Also, resale value of lenses is much higher. If a new body comes out, it will be almost half price for a used one within a few years. With lenses, the most you'll save is a couple hundred dollars. For example, my 70-200mm f/4L was $500 used, but it listed for $650 new and this model has been around for several years. $150 off the new price is hardly any depreciation, and $500 was a bargain.
     
  16. Price for the IS 2 has started to come down. Cameraland is selling it new for $2419.99 at the big auction site now including free shipping.
     

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