Camera Serial Number

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by jerry_curtis, Nov 22, 2011.

  1. Is there a way to tell roughly when a Nikon DSLR was made using the serial number?
     
  2. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Typically, among the same model, the later a camera is manufactured, the higher its serial number. Therefore, if you have the serial numbers for a few samples of the same model with known purchase/manufacture dates, you can get an idea when the one you have in mind was manufactured. The more known samples you have and the more distributed they are throughout the production cycle, the more accurate the estimate will be.
    Do you have a particular camera in mind? What is the model and what is its serial number?
     
  3. dSLRs are a mystery, to me anyhow.
    But, in case anybody wants to know, for the Nikon F and F2, deStoutz's most valuable site has data:
    http://www.destoutz.ch/typology_body_general.html
    You will note that the old idea that the first two numbers are the year of production of F series cameras is like a broken clock. It's only right now and again.
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    For example, photo.net received a Nikon J1 test sample in early October, about two weeks before it was available in the general market. That J1 has a serial number 32000233. When the serial number is as low as 233, you know that it is among the earliest samples.
    If you are willing to post the serial number you have in mind, perhaps other members here with the same camera model can give you an idea when that one was manufactured. You can always not provide the last couple of digits if you don't want to reveal your serial number completely.
    00Zdhp-417813584.jpg
     
  5. Sam:
    Now you've got me curious -- why would someone be reticent to reveal the serial number on their camera?
     
  6. Now you've got me curious -- why would someone be reticent to reveal the serial number on their camera?​
    Well, someone could play a bad prank on you and, for example, report that camera stolen. Or try to register under a false name.
     
  7. In any case, it's common practice to list the serial number with the last three or so digits converted to x's.
    e.g., my F2 is 7439xxx
     
  8. Well, someone could play a bad prank on you and, for example, report that camera stolen.
    Red herring. Unless that someone could prove they were owner of said camera with some form of verifiable documentation, it's a "he said, she said" claim of theft that no competent police force would give any credence to.
     
  9. Unless that someone could prove they were owner of said camera with some form of verifiable documentation, it's a "he said, she said" claim of theft that no competent police force would give any credence to.​
    Very likely true - but what if that someone had entered the serial number in one of the numerous "stolen property" sites on the internet (photo.net has such a registry too) - that could certainly spell some trouble for the rightful owner; for example, if he wanted to sell the equipment. Be that as it may - there simply is no good reason to voluntarily give the full serial number of any piece of equipment. I seem to recall that there are quite a few posts here on photo.net of people not happy that lens serial numbers are included in the EXIF data and hence accessible to everyone unless said data is stripped from uploaded images.
     
  10. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Right, someone could play a prank and report your camera serial number to some stolen camera list. Should you want to sell your camera in the future and some potential buyer finds the serial number there, it isn't exactly helpful.
    It certainly is not a major concern, but as long as you don't need to provide too much information, I would give out as little info as possible. Had that been my own J1 body, I would have obscured the last 2, 3 digits in the serial number in the image above. Since that is Nikon USA's test sample, I don't care. :)
     

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