Cage Fighting

Discussion in 'Sports' started by spearhead, Jul 26, 2007.

  1. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    Has anyone shot cage fighting? I usually shoot boxing with ropes, where I can
    avoid having the ropes in photos in a number of ways. I've been hired for some
    fights tomorrow and now know that they will be in a cage. I've seen some shots
    of cage fighting that don't have the cage in the foreground, but I'm not sure if
    they are vidcaps off a video camera on a boom.
     
  2. Most of the photos I have seen are taken low to the mat. Are there camera portals in the bottom of the cage walls to allow you to shoot from outside?
     
  3. Just like at a race track, ther should be some fence cuts to get your lens through and move it around. Be sure to bring along a pair of diagonal cutters & wire pliers; or (better yet) a pair of 8" lineman's pliers so you can snip open & bend back a couple links... Just be sure to get permission, because (unlike a race track with a mile & half perimeter) you'll be spotted right away if you cut the cage! :)
     
  4. I've never shot cage fighting (not my cup of tea!) but can offer this from experience: with lens held right up to the fencing material and shooting at/near wide open, the fencing won't even appear on the image. This has proven successful with normal to longer lenses and suspect results will be comparable for wide angle for close action.

    The objective is to absolutely minimize the distance between glass and wire. Thus when shooting to your right (i.e. at an angle vs. straight through), the left side of the front element (UV filter or recessed element?!) ought to be against the wire while the majority of the frame is largely unobstructed as you shoot through the 'hole' as compared to leaving the left side unobstructed with the right side of the glass being x inches from the wire. Remove the hood and use your hand to shield if need be as the hood may work against you.

    Steady the lens by placing your left hand at/near filter ring and against fence to keep the wire on the near-side periphery unless, of course, the action is right in front of you and causing the fence to move...in which case you might get a nice 'face mashed to chain-link' image! Chain-link is made in various gauges...for safety purposes the cage will likely have a thicker-than-normal gauge to minimize the 'cheese-wire' effect on tender flesh.

    Provided you have no conflict with posting images in this forum, do share an image or two and let is know how it goes.
     
  5. Just read the snipping suggestions and have to chuckle. Are you people serious? That'll get you thrown-out in a NY minute or dragged into the cage for a good beating...as if cage-fighting weren't sufficiently dangerous, what's wrong with exposing fighters to severe puncture wounds?! Good grief!
     
  6. CUT THE FENCE WITH PLIERS??? LMAO!!!
     
  7. Look at some of these, Jeff. It looks like they're shot through the chainlink fences with lens right up against it at wide aperture. Somewhat like shooting behind baseball homeplate backstop, but with shorter focal length. Chainlink opening is around 2-inch square, so centering lens, keeping camera perpendicular to fence, and relatively wide aperture setting should do the trick. Also, although probably not realistic, looks like there's access to top of fence, but that's probably for the trainers rather for photogs. Might worth squeezing out a few shots from up there nevertheless for different view point. Do post some up and let us know how it went after the gig, Jeff. I'm sure many can learn from your experience.
     
  8. Joe and Lilly,

    Hey, it works at a speedway!

    ------------

    I only cut the thin wires, not the 1/2 inch retention cables.

    There's nothing more fun than ducking carbon fibre from a 230 MPH wreck just inches from my Nikon's lens!
     
  9. Jeff, after reading Wilson's posting, it got me thinking: Why not try a long monopod with remote release, so you can get altitude over the fence -- And a different perspective.

    Also (and/or), try to get access to the catwalk over the ring.

    ...And/Or, ask if the arena has radio triggered strobes in the rafters which you can rent for the event, as they are de rigeir for NBA & NHL games...
     
  10. I love it Dan, take wire cutters hahahaha. Now I've seen it all priceless.
     
  11. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    Why not try a long monopod with remote release, so you can get altitude over the fence -- And a different perspective.
    We're not allowed to do things like this. For one thing, it gets in the way of the ESPN/SpikeTV booms.
    Also (and/or), try to get access to the catwalk over the ring.
    Don't have them, would interfere with the booms.
    ...And/Or, ask if the arena has radio triggered strobes in the rafters which you can rent for the event, as they are de rigeir for NBA & NHL games...
    I know about this, but there isn't enough money in this stuff to cover the labor to do that.
    Some interesting suggestions, thanks for the response, the wire cutter one is sure to get me banned by the state boxing commission, so I think I will pass on that...
     
  12. The trick with shooting through a cage is to use a shallow depth of field and a telephoto 70mm or more. Get as close as can to the fence shoot at f/2.8 or greater. When shooting focus on the fighters the shallow depth of field blur the fence to the point in will be hardly noticeable. You can also use the fence to frame the fighters by using a 24mm or wider at f/4 or smaller. As for TV they shoot through the fence and also use a boom. I hope this helps.
    00M1Ej-37667584.jpg
     

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