Buy a New D800 from Individual

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by dan_brown|4, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. There is a local offer to sell a new D800 (zero shutter actuations, in box) for $3250, which is about the price locally with sales tax. Seller says he will give retail receipt with US model camera. Also, states that he pre-ordered and bought both D800 and D800e, and decided to go with the D800e, hence the sale of the D800. It would be a face-to-face deal for cash, so the camera can be carefully inspected.
    My question: Could I actually get full Nikon warranty support by having his receipt?
     
  2. In the USA, Nikon warranties are not transferable.
     
  3. I think if you check with Nikon, you will find that the warranty is not transferable but if the seller is local, if you have an issue, you might be able to go through him.
     
  4. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I am not sure that I would buy that story. This guy seems be a scalper.
    In the US, Nikon warranty is not transferable. If he indeed doesn't want the D800, he should be returning it. I think Dan is better off ordering a D800 now and wait for it; I can't imagine that it'll take more than a few weeks.
     
  5. << not transferable >>
    If the camera is brand new and not registered, and there is a formal sale receipt from the seller, won't it be similar to buying from a big company? -- This is always a question in my mind.
     
  6. If the receipt is a generic receipt like a gift receipt yes, if it has the original purchaser's name/address on it, no.
     
  7. That's what I thought. I did call Nikon USA, but couldn't get through to anybody who knew that answer, and their knowledge-base on-line help wasn't much.
    It did look like I could go on-line and register the camera, since there are no warranty cards packed with DSLR's anymore. Then, just keep the receipt and submit it in the case of warranty service. But, I think the selling dealer might submit a record of the sale to Nikon USA, and they could cross reference the authenticity of the sale.
    Honestly, it kind of pisses me off. I can understand the gray market issue, but why can't Nikon USA warrant their own products through the warranty period, regardless of who presently possesses the product? Most high quality products are warranted that way. It basically says "Hey, we're Nikon, and we hate supporting our products, so we dodge that responsibility at the very first change we can.
     
  8. Also, have there been any D800E's shipped from Nikon USA?
     
  9. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Dan, this is merely my guess: warranties are for protecting the consumer from manufacturing defects. When a product changes hands so that there are multiple owners over time, sometimes it becomes difficult to judge whether a defect was there when the product left the factory or it was caused by previous owners. I suppose Nikon simply does not want to get into any argument with the current owner about whether a problem should be fixed under warranty (free of charge) or the current owner should pay for repair.
    Nikon USA warranties lenses for 5 years. Potentially a lens can change hands several times during that period.
     
  10. I'm going to go with my gut, and say NO.
    Thanks for all your inputs.
     
  11. Face to face cash deal! good way to get mugged and be out 3k.
     
  12. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    If you have to do a face-to-face cash deal when the amount is large, after you inspect the item, I suppose the buyer and seller can go to a bank together and do a money transfer at the teller; no actual cash will change hands.
    Of course, someone could mug you afterwards and take the camera, but that is no different from taking your D800 out in public and take pictures.
     
  13. The seller did request that the transaction occur at a bank. Most likely, he is trying to flip it for the $250, and he will probably succeed at that.
     
  14. I would tentatively offer a much lower price to see what sort of a response I would get.This might indicate if it was bona fide.
     
  15. If he buys from local store like Best Buy, sure that receipt is good since there's no name attached.
    Local store that inputs your name onto the receipt, or online receipts with names are no good.
    I have a guy locally who's selling 4 D800s for $3800 each, and another selling $4200...
    I placed 3 pre-orders from B&H Amazon Abes of Maine and non of them gives shipping confirmation. Amazon simply gave up giving me an update (I ordered on the 2/6) and the system simply shows no delivery estimate. Abes is telling me early May. B&H nothing..that really piss me off and at the same time some guy got 4 copies of it for flipping.....
     
  16. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I can't believe all this craziness about getting the D800 immediately. I have been shooting DSLRs for 10 years and have 6 different Nikon DSLRs at home. Why can't we wait a few weeks for supply to catch up? I know it is easy for me to say that since Nikon is sending me a loaner for evaluation so that I don't have to pay and get to use one for a month.
    It is insane that there are people who are flipping D800 for a $1000 profit.
    But no offense Richard, isn't it exactly those who pre-order from multiple sources who are creating (or at least contributing to) this chaos? B&H and Amazon may think they have a lot of orders, but as soon as those people who manage to find one elsewhere, they are going to cancel those pre-orders immediately. How exactly do you expect B&H and Amazon, etc. to run their business?
    The only time I pre-ordered was the D7000 from my local store. They required a $500 deposit. Mine arrived a week after the launch and I picked up immediately.
     
  17. If the deal is local and is for $3250 - which is about what you'd pay anyway - and he wants to meet in a bank / public place - then I'd go for it.
    What I would not do is pay $800.00 more than retail for the camera. I've never got caught up in the gotta have it nonsense that goes on with the latest and greatest toys.
    My D200 was bought 3 weeks after release. D300 2 weeks. D700 6 months. D7000 3 months. - Never paid more than retail for any of them.
    Dave
     
  18. I am really curious to see if it only will be a matter of weeks before D800's are readily available or not. I know Nikon is closed til the 3rd, so there won't be any new cameras for at least a week. I know I placed a pre-order with B&H 8am the morning after it was announced, and I didn't get in on the first shipment of cameras. Right now I've just got a D7000 and I'm not happy with the focus (mine tends to off about 25% of the time). I've been putting shoots on hold for a month now. Sure, I suppose if its that important I should just go out and buy whats available, but I have to have a solid video mode as I make a good portion of my living from video that eliminates all Nikon cameras except what I already have and the D800 & D4. I've already lost out on at least a thousand dollars because I didn't have it for film shoots. I only hope it makes it here the first week of April like I've been promised, because other wise I may loose out on several more thousand dollars worth of film shoots :(.
     
  19. Even if there was a warranty, something this new I'd be inclined to wait... I understand your temptation though...
     
  20. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I am really curious to see if it only will be a matter of weeks before D800's are readily available or not.​
    Do you know that B&H had the D3 in stock within a day or two of the initial launch date? I.e. within a day or two since Nikon USA started shipping them to the dealers? A number of people on this forum had no trouble getting their D3 within the first month, without any pre-ordering.
    I already mentioned that the D700's price dropped from the initial $3000 to $2400 within like 3 months.
    And if you check DPReview's Nikon D4/D800 forum, a number of people have walked into their local Best Buy and just picked up brand new D800 in the last few days, but most of those had to check a few Best Buy stores before they could locate one. There is no reason for me to believe those stories are not true.
    Don't get misled by all the hype. We are still under a tough economy, world wide, and $3000 is still a lot for a camera. Those who pre-order from multiple stores while they only need one camera is contributing to the confusion. I am sure the D800 is a fine camera, but as long as you are willing to wait a few weeks, there is no reason that you can't get one at reasonable prices.
     
  21. On a newly introduced camera such as the D800, I would want a warranty in case there are bugs.
    Kent in SD
     
  22. My local camera store always puts my name on the receipt. I am not sure all retailers do.
    Why is he offering the camera for $250 over cost when he could probably get munch more on E-bay
    Buyer beware
     
  23. Doesn't pass my sniff test.
     
  24. Do you know that B&H had the D3 in stock within a day or two of the initial launch date?​
    Did you know that in over twice the amount time after the D800 was released that no one had it in stock? The references to the past have already been proven wrong, hence the reason I'm curious. Maybe we'll say the D3 was in stock 2 days after, the D800 2 weeks after. Maybe we'll say 2 months. Maybe we'll say longer. But its really irrelevant, we'll all know soon enough if Nikon will catch up, or this initial shortage will continue.
    I already mentioned that the D700's price dropped from the initial $3000 to $2400 within like 3 months.​
    Yes you already mentioned it; I was a disappointed to see you haven't taken into account the common sense points I made previously.
    The D700 was the very first product of its kind, Nikon had never made a FX camera that didn't have a the built in battery pack. That makes it a tough sell. Where as Nikon's been building that market for 4 years, and all those people that are hooked on the D700 are potential D800 buyers. In addition it now offers something that no other camera does, a higher resolution sensor than any other 35mm DSLR on the planet. This opens up whole new markets like the medium format users who previously felt DSLRs didn't offer enough resolution. These common sense points would suggest, nay, demand the probability that the D800 sales and by extension price reductions, will be drastically different.
    And if you check DPReview's Nikon D4/D800 forum, a number of people have walked into their local Best Buy and just picked up brand new D800 in the last few days,'​
    A friend of mine once bought a like new Nikon 300mm F/2.8 AFS VR lens for $2000, because the photographer who owned it past away and his daughter didn't know what it was worth. Doesn't mean I would start suggesting to people that the normal price for a like new 300mm F/2.8 AFS VR was $2000. Also just out of curiosity I checked Best Buy's website, its sold out online and I checked over 30 stores in 4 states, and couldn't find one store that had a D800.
     
  25. Shun u are right I am going to cancel the other 2 pre-orders and just wait for one to arrive eventually rather than
    contributing to the confusion. My d700 is in the shop with a 6 week backordered part which got extend to 8 weeks so I
    am going to forget about taking pictures for a while or perhaps use my wife's d5100...
     
  26. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Did you know that in over twice the amount time after the D800 was released that no one had it in stock?​
    Did you read what I pointed out about people posted to DPReview that a few of them have walked into local Best Buy and bought the D800 off the shelf, all in the last few days?
    Of course not every Best Buy has a bunch of D800 in stock waiting for you, but if you want one immediately, you need to do some work and check around, perhaps 2, 3 times a week. Otherwise, you can always put down a deposit now at your local store, and you can get it in a few weeks.
    You can read that youself: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1021&message=41000186
    There are a few similar threads. If you want the details, do a little search yourself.
     
  27. I bought a D5100 a few weeks ago to get video, and use as a compact travel camera. I actually like it. Image quality is quite good, at the expense of some convenience. If you can't take nice images with a D5100, you won't do it with a D800 either.
    Kent in SD
     
  28. As Shun suggests, very often you can find a local dealer who has one in stock without a pre-order to cover it. Nikon has a fair distribution strategy. Surely they know they could funnel huge numbers of cameras through Amazon, B&H alone. But they tend to serve the local dealers even-handedly. I picked up my D3 at a small dealership when the big stores were wiped out.
    About your D800 offer. The original dealer may be willing to re-invoice the camera to you if you transact the sale in the store. In that case, you'd get a full manufacturer's warranty. I have been offered the ability to do this by a local dealer where I am. In other words, if I want to sell my D4, then the dealer who sold it to me would re-invoice it to the buyer. That would give you more of the assurance you're looking for, as well as verifying the original purchase.
     
  29. I called the best local dealer, who sells to all the PJ's and studios, and they said the first shipment sold through, but that the next shipment would arrive within 2-weeks, and that it should more than satisfy their "list". So, it's not going to be so bad here in DFW, TX.
     
  30. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    they said the first shipment sold through, but that the next shipment would arrive within 2-weeks, and that it should more than satisfy their "list". So, it's not going to be so bad here in DFW, TX.​
    That is very typical.
    I bought my D300 from my local store around Thanksgiving of 2007. Their first shipment satisfied everybody on their waiting list. They called me up when the 2nd shipment arrived a week later and I just walked in and bought one.
    I pre-ordered my D7000. Once again the first shipment took care of everybody who pre-ordered. A friend of mine walked in and bought one off the shelf like 2, 3 weeks later. His problem was that they only had D7000 kits available, so he was stuck with the 18-105 that he had to sell privately afterwards.
    At least there are no "kit lens" issues with the D800.
    I am sure those scalpers are a bit concerned. Once people who read posts such as mine and are not so crazy about getting a D800 immediately, those scalpers could easily be stuck with some D800 that may have to try very hard to break even.
     
  31. I think a re invoicing is a wonderful idea. And it really isn't that much more expensive than buying a new one anyways.
    Despite what everyone is saying, if it was me, I would pay $3250 for a camera today. But then again I've got film jobs that I could get if I had the camera today that would easily cover half the cost of the camera.

    I've been told that B&H has over 7800 pre-orders. Lets say hypothetically Shun is right, and everyone who placed pre-orders on the D800 did so at 3 other places, and lets assume that 75% of the people end up cancelling there order. That's still almost 2000 pre-orders, and B&H received a total of 40 cameras (I heard). Maybe those scalpers will continue to make good on their investment after all. I think its a gamble to take the advice of anyone who suggests you look at other Nikon releases, and its ok to wait and in a very short time period they will be cheaper. I've already clearly stated my reasons. If I knew of a way to get one for sure, you betcha I would would tell ya, but right now, its all a crap shoot.
    Believe me I have checked around, of course presently I am in Idaho, not exactly a camera store on every potato farm corner. The local dealer has over 25 pre-orders and received 2 cameras last week. The Best Buys up here don't even carry a D300, or D7000, much less a D800.
     
  32. it is easy for me to say that since Nikon is sending me a loaner for evaluation so that I don't have to pay and get to use one for a month.​
    rub it in why dontcha?
     
  33. I placed a pre-order for the D800 through B+H just after 9:00 a.m. (CST) on February 7th. I browsed through a few forums over the weekend, and it seems everyone has a different story to tell. B+H's policy on the matter seems to actually be: any exact information regarding the number of pre-orders, or number of D800's they received is confidential. I believe that perhaps some of their customer reps are just telling stories to the floods of "where's my camera?!" calls they've no doubt been receiving. A lot of the info posted right now seems to be merely rumor and speculation.
    I held off until early today to give B+H a call myself. The individual I spoke with told me they only received 10 D800's in their first shipment, but had been expecting far more than that. He also said that anyone who placed a pre-order after the first 1 or 2 days might be in for a very long wait. I was told that late April or early May was the best I could hope for on my particular order.
    This is my first experience with pre-ordering a camera, and the D800 will be my first major upgrade since I started my business. I've been holding off on switching to full-frame for quite awhile now. I currently shoot with a D200, and it's technical limitations (mainly ISO and auto-focus) have became real hindrances. The enhanced resolution of the D800 will likely be a huge step forward as well.
    As to Dan's question - As far as I know Nikon's warranties are not transferable. This individual seems to simply be looking to make a profit. If he really decided to go with a D800E instead of the D800, why not just return the D800? Looking across the web it's almost sickening to see all the people trying to "scalp" this camera. Everyone's wondering where all those D800 bodies went to...apparently to a plethora of people who never intend to even use it. As tempting as it might be, I'd pass on purchasing this particular D800. If I was going to pay $3250 for this camera, I'd just regularly check with Best Buy stores until I find one that received a shipment. You'd likely pay around that same amount with tax, and be assured that the warranty is valid.
     
  34. The simple answer to your warranty repair question is 'no', and any other suggestion is fraud.
    Nikon USA warranties expressly are non-transferable.
    The re-invoicing idea is probably not fraud; it involves basically rescinding the sale and redoing the transaction, on paper at least; what legally might be called a novation.
    I'm not so sure Nikon USA would approve, but that's probably between Nikon and the dealer; we don't know their agreement.
    (Thanks to Luke Kavens for that idea; I never heard of it being done successfully or even tried.)
    To those who think they can get a camera or lens Nikon USA warranty repair by claiming it was a gift when it was not and or claiming they were the original purchaser or recipient of a gift, and then fill and send in a blank registration card that came with used equipment, that is telling a lie, and to get a financial advantage from telling that lie is fraud.
    Getting warranty coverage and/or repairs that way is a fraud and civilly and criminally illegal in all US jurisdictions, even if not prosecuted.
    Of course, no one probably is going to prosecute on that alone, but if some prosecutor for some other reason starts going through your affairs toothpick by toothpick and catches that, that's the sort of thing they add to the list of 'things you shouldn't have done' and start adding to other charges, or if they can't make other charges stick, it may be the one that gets charged!
    It doesn't matter that you might not get caught, if doing the right thing is important to you, but if doing a little cheating is OK by you, then at least acknowledge that falsely claiming a purchase as a gift is indeed a fraud.
    Even if a camera or lens comes with a blank warranty card, there's no assurance somebody hasn't already registerred that equipment by telephone, fax or Internet, perhaps when they sought instruction, over-the-phone advice about whether or not to send it for repair, or for some other reason. Nikon's reps may have asked for ownership info at that time and they may have given it and registered it.
    It's possible therefore the equipment may have been without anyone's sending any warranty registration card, so the blank card's presence in any box or with any equipment is no guarantee of anything, no matter what they tell you.
    And since you would be perpetrating a fraud by saying it's a gift and registering for repairs , if you are refused repairs because it already was registered, you have no one to complain to if your seller has cheated you, because you know you're doing a fraud, and by that time so does the manufacturer. You're just stuck and your lying seller gets away Scot Free.
    john
    John (Crosley)
     
  35. I can't believe all this craziness about getting the D800 immediately.
    I also watch it with eyes wide open. I think what's going on is that people who have been holding off on an FX camera purchase now figure that the advantages with the D800 are sufficient to warrant the cost, and the high price of the D3X may have upset some users and increased the perceived desirability of high resolution. Finally, the tsunami and flooding in Japan last year caused some delays in Nikon's schedule for introducing new cameras (and poor availability of the older models in the USA) leading to further increased demand. All of this is released with the D800 coming to the market.
    I would recommend people to listen to Shun. I've seen the same things many times over and over again - each time there is a major release with significant improvements there is a lot of huffing and puffing and pre-ordering etc. And people complain about the delays in the first three months. Then six month later the cameras sit on dealers' shelves and traffic is slow, so the prices are gradually reduced. In my opinion, 4-6 months after general release of a camera is a good time to buy. You get to check it out, how it feels in your hands, and you've heard of all the problems there are and can make an informed decision as to which camera to purchase. Yesterday's Nikon event in Helsinki changed my mind about the D800 but for a different reason I had expected - what I had feared turned about not to be true (24 PC-E works ok), but the viewfinder eyepoint was not sufficient with the positioning of the ocular in this body, and I will not be buying this camera. I also felt while quieter than the D700 that they could do some work on that aspect of the D800. I guess the FX cameras will always be a bit louder than the D7000. I will most likely buy a D4 in 6-12 months, hoping to get it for just over 5000€. I should expect the price of the D800 may not be reduced as quickly as Canon's 5D Mk III is priced significantly higher than the D800, so Nikon doesn't have immediate pressure to reduce the price but eventually that too will happen, it might take about 12 months though as first Canon has to get competitive with their pricing. Unfortunately even if Sony does bring a 36MP FX model out it is not likely it will pressure Nikon or Canon price-wise as Sony doesn't have all that many users of their high-end gear. But there are always some users. Sony certainly has the expertise on video, another matter is whether they are willing to apply it in their DSLRs. I am not too much of a fan of the pellicle mirror designs; I think that is a mistake. But for someone needing fluid AF in video it does make it possible.
     
  36. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    I would recommend people to listen to Shun.​
    Hard to believe Ilkka would ever say that. :)
    Not that I would to send people to other Nikon forums, but if you have a few minutes, take a look at DPReview's Nikon D4/D800 forum: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/forum.asp?forum=1021
    There are a lot of threads from people who pre-ordered as soon as the D800 was announced on February 6, 7 (depending on your time zone), and they keep calling and writing Amazon, B&H, etc. trying to find out why theirs is not shipped in the first batch. These folks merely generate a lot of totally unnecessary anxirety for themselves.
    The D800 is just a camera, perhaps a very good one, but your old D200, D300, D700, D3 or D7000 is still working ok. You'll survive if you have to use those for another 3 months. Nikon is making 30,000 of them each month; that is a lot. But if you indeed can't wait, there is some scalper on Amazon that is selling a D800 for a mere $4200. As a bonus, you will get a receipt to remind you how much NAS and being impatient cost you. :)
    P.S. I would take all of those B&H order and sales numbers of a grain of salt. That is proprietry information that I am sure they would not release.
     
  37. I think Ilkka is right a lot of people have been waiting on the D700's successor to upgrade to FX, so the demand is
    particularly high. I'm not ashamed to say I've waited for this camera for over two years (ever since I shot the D3s I've
    waited for Nikon to release a FF camera with solid video). I have been forced to use a D7000 for the past year because
    no other Nikon camera has decent video. I'm not happy with it, I think it's AF system is so so, it's not weather sealed
    nearly enough for my uses, I always finding myself in situations I need FF (I've got the 24mm F1.4 and frequently find
    myself up against the wall because it isn't wide enough, and yes those are scenarios where F/1.4 is necesisary).

    I'm not ashamed to say I need FF, I need better AF and I need better weather sealing. And when im shooting video i often
    need the ability to shoot in a type of lossless codec. And I'm not ashamed to say that those features will improve my
    photography. I will say that I'm in a very small group. Most people could get a D700 or other Nikon FF body today if they
    really need it, but I require a solid video mode and only the D7000 has that (beside the D800 & D4 of course).

    Ilkka, I take Nikon's new MSRP program seriously, and it is my humble opinion that we will not see price drops in these
    new models. Of course time will tell, but personally I would not advice anyone to wait based on a future price reduction
    because I think it's a crap shoot.
     
  38. I've waited for this camera for over two years
    That has been your choice. The D800 is not the first capable video camera nor the first high quality still camera, and there is no law that says that you have to use one camera for both tasks, convenient as it might be if it really worked well. Trust me, there is never going to be a perfect camera; an important part of the design process is to make it good enough that many people will buy it and not too good so that they'll also buy the next model. It won't take long before you will find flaws in the D800 which put you into waiting mode again, if you're inclined to do that. While you wait, others do.
    I take Nikon's new MSRP program seriously, and it is my humble opinion that we will not see price drops in these new models.
    After Nikon announced the MSRP program they conveniently announced a significant price drop on the D700 and that there would be no minimum price on it. Prices are always reduced on consumer electronics products after the initial demand has subsided, unless some extraordinary event prevents supply (or the currency rates change so drastically that you get the illusion that prices are not dropping). Nikon does not have the power to change how the market economy works, and neither do I believe they really want to.
     
  39. Ilkka, you've clearly never done my kind of work, or else the D800's revolutionary new features that exist in no other
    camera on the planet currently, except it's bigger brother the D4, would be much more apparent to you.

    When you said that you didn't like the 36MP sensor because the RAW files will take up too much space, I didn't tell you
    that was your choice, that you could choose to buy bigger hard drives/cards if you wanted. I respected the fact that the
    D800's features didn't work for you, because I believe you know your work and it's flow better than anyone, so only you
    can be the judge of what works and what doesn't for you and your jobs. I would appreciate the same respect in return,
    you don't know my work, what my clients require, the limitations of my travel, or how the D800 will have a huge impact on
    these things.

    The D800 will allow me to do things I could not previously, because it offers things that no other cameras does. That
    makes it important enough to preorder or take the scalpers seriously.
     
  40. I am shocked B&H claimed they only received 10 cameras - for such a large customer base. If this is true, I recommend Nikon to apportion their quota more equitably. I got mine from Hunts Photo, who also claimed to have received 10 cameras. But it's a smaller outfit (at least so I think).
     
  41. Just checked eBat: Many D800 have been sold for much more than $3K!
     
  42. ShunCheung

    ShunCheung Administrator

    Mary, eBay is always a crazy place. Sometimes used lenses are sold for more than new prices. Again, NAS is powerful. Hopefully the craziness will die down after a few more days (and some more supply from Nikon).
    Of course, some of us are posting images of the D800 and images captured by the D800. We are not exactly helping. :)
     

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