Brightness vs shadow recovery

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by KoolM1, Dec 21, 2020.

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  1. digitaldog

    digitaldog Andrew Rodney

    As your posting history proves, you're only interested in an answer that syncs with your predetermined confirmation bias.
    If you do, go on record and tell me you have Adobe Photoshop, that you finally moved from Elements of which you've posted about here in the past. If so, welcome (very late) to the club.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2020
  2. Come on, tell us all here if you brought up the issue of Adobe's use of a term prone to misunderstanding or not, and if so, what their justification was!
    I have had Photoshop since 2000 and switched to Photoshop Elements some time ago. Anything wrong with that?
     
  3. digitaldog

    digitaldog Andrew Rodney

    ALL my discussions with Adobe are under NDA and I take NDAs seriously.
    Adobe has no such misunderstanding. I have no such misunderstanding. Some users do have such misunderstandings. No one here should now confuse what Exposure is in a photographic capture, something I've never seen proof you've ever made, with a slider in software named "Exposure". Because the differences were correctly outlined pages ago. Or are you not sure the difference between Exposure in photography, again something I don't know you have ever tried, with 'Exposure" in an Adobe product?
    I've had Photoshop since May of 1990. And I can fully understand your need to switch from Photoshop to Elements. Nothing wrong with that. Some tools are far too powerful and complex for some users, which is why Adobe produced Elements. :rolleyes:
    Meanwhile, your lack of a reply to a question about luminosity in Photoshop speaks volumes, a prime example of your MO: don't answer the question, but ridicule, attack and obfuscate.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2020
  4. I RELY ON NIK, WHICH USES PHOTOSHOP AND PROVIDES AN ARRAY OF THUMBNAIL VERSIONS OF YOUR FILE. THESE THUMBNAILS ARE EXCELLENT RENDITIONS OF WHAT YOU HOPE FOR FROM A PRINT...BUT YOU CAN FINE TUNE EACH ONE, INCLUDING SHADOW AND HIGHLIGHT DARKNESS, VIGNETTING, DODGING/BURNING AND VIGNETTING. I USED THE FREE VERSION FOR YEARS, WAS HAPPY TO PAY FOR IT WHEN THAT SEEMED THE BEST OPTION.
     
  5. Wow, another thread that reminds me of the old days on this site.

    I tried to read it all, but still can't figure out who "Mr. Rodney" is, and there are many other mysteries. Has there been heavy "moderation" or are my eyes just glazing over?

    FWIW, and that may not be much, if you're going to do photo editing, you need a program that started as a full-blown editor, not a cataloging application. In short, belly up to the bar and get Photoshop.

    Perhaps, if you use it long enough and have enough patience, you could get GIMP working for you.
     
  6. this hasn’t been true for a long time. What matters isn’t what the software started as, but rather what it can do. Lightroom has evolved to the point where it’s a powerful editor, although not as powerful as Photoshop. You should look at what Jeff Schewe does with Lightroom. I use both, but I’ve exhibited prints that were done entirely inLightroom.
     
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  7. Andrew Rodney aka digitaldog who behaves more like a digitalcur. He knows it all and will make sure everybody knows it or else.
     
  8. Well, at least we don't have to put up with the lunacy of 'Brightness' (actually black-level) and 'Contrast' (white level brightness) controls on CRT monitors anymore.
     
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