Apple Trackpad

Discussion in 'Digital Darkroom' started by sanford, Jun 29, 2016.

  1. Can you do fine, precise photo editing with a trackpad?
     
  2. Tricky, but yes. You have to have steady hands.
     
  3. I've used many trackpads, but not this one in particular.
    In general, I would say precise editing is not feasible. I qualify that to some extent because you can adjust the sensitivity and, more important, the acceleration effect (faster motion = greater action).
    The main purpose of a track pad is for navigation around a screen. If you want to do precise editing, get a tablet (e.g., Wacom) which can be used with a pen or mouse. You can control a pen with much more precision than the tip of your finger, including position and pressure. Secondly the pad will sense the position of the pen without touching the screen, hence drawing a line or making a selection.
    Many credit card stations now ask you to sign using your finger. How well does that work out compared to using a pen or stylus?
     
  4. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    I use one all the time. You can get more precision by magnifying the image and shrinking the size of the tool, if appropriate.
    Many credit card stations now ask you to sign using your finger. How well does that work out compared to using a pen or stylus?​

    Credit card tablets are very different than a) the Apple trackpad, and b) photo editing platforms.
     
  5. EricM

    EricM Planet Eric

    Fine, precise photo editing with a trackpad? It's hard enough with a mouse let alone the track pad so I'd say no to the question. However, I've never tried to make selections or masks with it. It's a task for the wacom, imo.
     
  6. Trackpads can be pretty darn precise if they are large enough but it takes a long time to get used to it. I think a texture on the pad sometimes helps too.
     
  7. I got my first - and so far only - iMAC about 4 years ago. Before leaving the Apple store, I tried both mouse and trackpad; I found the trackpad considerably easier to use. I'm absolutely comfortable using it to edit my photographs.
     
  8. No problem with mine.
     
  9. A Wacom tablet can be set to absolute (whole screen) or relative (mouse) positioning. Is that possible with the Apple Trackpad?
     
  10. digitaldog

    digitaldog Andrew Rodney

    No problem on this end for me on my MacBook Pro. Like any input device, it takes time and practice but once done, I'm fine using it precisely.
     
  11. I have a Lenovo Thinkpad which has a built-in joy stick and track pad. Most of the time I use a wireless track ball. The last has the advantage being stationary, with separate buttons and a scroll control. I use my hand in much the same way as for a mouse, not my thumb, but without having to lift and reposition a mouse when it runs out of space. Whether at my desk or abroad, a track ball handles nearly all of my editing needs. On those rare occasions when I need precise control, I have a Wacom pad.
    A simple track pad like the Apple usually maps several functions onto a simple work space - position, select and scroll. Since there are no buttons, you usually lift your finger and tap the screen once or twice to make a selection. It is often very difficult to do this without changing the position (and very easy with a track ball or Wacom). Alternate functions are accomplished by using a certain portion of the track pad, or by using two or more fingers at the same time.
    As I said, I use them all at various times, but the track ball is probably three times as fast as the others for most operations, including photo editing. Bluetooth also incurs a delay between 0.02 and 0.2 seconds, which can make life interesting at the upper end of that range. (My trackball has no noticeable delay, whereas headphones and sound console remotes push the high end.)
     
  12. Works fine for me. I have a pen but never got use to it.
     
  13. Spearhead

    Spearhead Moderator

    Since there are no buttons, you usually lift your finger and tap the screen once or twice to make a selection.​

    Only someone who hasn't used the Apple trackpad would say this. Always best to talk about something you've used.
     
  14. You could but it is hardly the best tool for editing. There are far better and easier tools.
     
  15. Only someone who hasn't used the Apple trackpad would say this. Always best to talk about something you've used.​
    I use an iPad and Lightroom Mobile, which seems to operate in much the same manner as the Apple Trackpad (according to Trackpad instructions). You lift your finger and tap to make a selection. I stand by my conclusion that a trackball is better, or a graphics pad like a Wacom.
    A trackpad is nearly unuseable for normal computer operations in a moving vehicle, whereas a trackball is nonplussed, and even a joy stick is better.
     

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