A Jupiter-9 85mm f/2 lens on my "Contax"

Discussion in 'Classic Manual Cameras' started by jdm_von_weinberg, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. I had the 35mm, 50mm, and 135mm for my Kiev 4A and my Contax II (née Kiev), but not the Jupiter-9 (copied from the pre-war Zeiss Sonnar 85mm f/2 (which generally sells for a few dollars more than the Jupiter-9, to say the least).
    So here, fresh from the summer of Kirov, Russian Federation, "city of twins" , comes my new baby.
    First, here is the Jupiter-9 lens on my "Contax II" -- Since Zeiss was so careless as to not have made a black Contax II, the problem was rectified by clever hands in the former USSR. Whoever did the conversion in this case, either started with an exceptional camera, or did a really superior CLA on the body in the process. I can't imagine that a genuine Contax would work any smoother. My Leica rangefinder assist is on the camera, and its own Sonnar 5s m f/2 is next to the camera.
    Finally, I decided that I didn't want to use the same old Tri-X that had expired in 3-90, so this time I used a roll that said "develop before 9-90". I'm sure that the 6-months difference will mean that this is much fresher.
    I developed the film in D-76 for 8 minutes, but got a little careless with the agitation, and still need to work on loading the reel better, the old skills have not entirely returned. Rinsed, fixed with Formulary Archival Fixer, then rinsed some more.
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  2. So here are some of the shots taken with it.
    First, my neighborhood, really (no Elder Hamish stuff here) and a flag put out by a friend for 4th of July.
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  3. Here are a couple of shots - one of the woods, still uncleared after our 108mph winds, and a house in the neighborhood with still-unrepaired roof. (I still have a head-sized hole in my bedroom wall, but otherwise was lucky).
    00TrlR-151989584.jpg
     
  4. Finally, the most notable feature of my neighborhood. Known officially as the Polyspheroid Water Tower, it is better known as the "big blue butt." These shots were taken this evening when the sun was low enough to throw tree shadows up on the water tower.
    I will note that the Elder Hamish in the area consider this totem to be obscene and evil and will drive many miles to avoid passing it. ;)
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  5. I am jealous of both your camera/lens and your local architecture. JR
     
  6. I've got a nice copy of the Jupiter 9, as well. I quite like the lens and use it on my "Real" Contax IIa and IIa as well as my Kiev 4a. I find it's best results are around f5.6 - f8.
    The flag shot shows good detail
    Pretty funny water tower and interesting shadow from the tree.
     
  7. The 4th of July Street is very nice. I like that camera; was very tempted to buy one from Ukraine. But resisted the same with great courage as I already have 4 different brands of cameras, all from Dresden and Ukraine! Thanks for the post; keep them coming. Regards, sp.
     
  8. Nice pics, I am jealous of your lens, which is on my shopping list.
    You have to wonder about the psychological makeup of anyone who would design that water tower.
     
  9. Or those who would BUY that design, perhaps as much?
     
  10. Interesting camera and photos. The camera looks nice in black. Processing looks A-OK, Congrats! That bubble butt water tower, with the tree shadow, is quite unusal.
     
  11. JDM,
    I have just got back from Moscow, Russia. I went to the main art market and had a fruitful conversation with a vendor of fake Leicas and Contaxes. I asked him regarding the CLA and he said actually no they do not perform extra careful CLA on faked Contaxes, just a standard one. The performance of your example is just because it was good to begin with.
     
  12. Thanks Kozma. My Kiev (still dressed as such) works well, for that matter, but I was surprised by this "Contax".
     
  13. My "Jupiter-9" is a chrome Nikkor 8.5cm f2 in Contax mount! It's one of the best lenses I've ever owned.
     
  14. [​IMG]
    Jupiter 9 on KMZ Narciss
     

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