A Challenge.

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by jsc|1, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. One of these images was taken with an Argus A (1938). The other image was taken with a Leica M3 DS (1956, date approximate...) and a Summicron 50 (1956, approximate).
    The film was identical (Fuji Acros 100). The exposure was identical. The development was identical.
    Which is which?
    And which do you like better?
    (just for fun)
     
  2. #1 is too dark on my screen; #2 is much better in that regard but lacks contrast and appears flat. No idea which one was taken with which camera - not that it matters anyway. Now, where does the fun part start?
     
  3. ?? Different exposures, different cameras, Low res Jpeg on screen. Enough shutterspeed for decent handheld sharpness? Too many variables.
     
  4. #2 is the Leica M3 and Summicron
     
  5. I'm not sure what I'm supposed to like about either of them.
     
  6. I see sharper corners and less vignetting on second picture, so I assume it's a f/2 lens stopped down a few stops, rather than a slower lens at maximum aperture? It probably has less distorsion too. So yes, I like second image "more", since it doesn't associate with that famous "brick" camera:)
     
  7. Top is Argus. Bottom is Summicron. But I don't like either of the shots - next time take a shot of something more interesting is my suggestion.
     
  8. They are evidence that people can and do take lousy photos with a crappy cam or with a Leica?
    More of "a Challenge" to take a beautiful photograph either with or without a Leica...
     
  9. I'm guessing the one with softness at the edges is the Argus (#1) evidenced by the fuzzy top of the drain pipe. I like the second one because the first one is too dark. The second one seems more "warm" in tone.
    Factors that were not taken into account are the uncoated lens of the Argus, different distances that the pic.s were shot from (leaves in some, not in others), if focusing is accurate in the Argus and condition of the Argus lens/accuracy of the shutter timing. Were both printed on the same type paper?
     
  10. I won't try to guess which is which, but I like number 2 better. Number 1 is too dark and a bit too contrasty. Number 2 looks like it has more shadow detail.
     
  11. Minute details are crisper in image number two thus IMHO taken with Leica/ Summicron.
     
  12. #1 most likely (by paradox) to be the summicron.
     
  13. How can I find the EXIF data?
     
  14. I prefer the IQ of the second image. If the first image was taken with the Leica, there is something wrong with the technique used, or the lens.
     
  15. You should be getting closer if you are shooting brick walls for testing ;)
    But yes, given the limited information, it is impossible to tell which was shot with which camera. The first is significantly lower in absolute IQ than the second. Vignetting, not sharp etc. It could be either the Leica or Argus shot wide open. The second is a lot sharper but stopped down, just about any lens can take sharp pictures.
    Which do I like better? I like Leica because that's what I have :)
     
  16. Both are crap...
     
  17. Ditto Thomas's remark. Image 2 is better IMHO
     
  18. How can I find the EXIF data?​
    I use the FxIF add-on in Firefox to view EXIF info: (for images #1 & 2)
    Camera Maker: Nikon
    Camera Model: Nikon SUPER COOLSCAN 9000 ED
    Image Date: 2010:06:16 09:27:56
    Color Space: Dot Gain 20%
    Camera Maker: Nikon
    Camera Model: Nikon SUPER COOLSCAN 9000 ED
    Image Date: 2010:06:16 09:28:21
    Color Space: Nikon Apple RGB 4.0.0.3000
     
  19. For what it's worth, I really like both pictures. The second one is better. I couldn't comment on the equipment.
     
  20. Josiah, this post has been around long enough now. Perhaps you can tell us which was taken with what.
     
  21. Of course, Alastair.
    Image #1 was taken with a fixed lens Argus A. The shutter/lens assembly 'reads' "I.R.C. f/4.5 Anastigmat."
    Image #2 was taken with a Leica M3 DS and a collapsible Summicron-M 50/2.
     

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