50mm FLE focuses past infinity

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by vick_ko, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. I found that my Hasselblad 50mm FLE lens focuses past infinity, when I turn to to its infinity stop
    No big issue, since it is SLR. Just a curiosity.
    Is that how your 50 FLE works?
    ....Vick
     
  2. My 50 FLE stops at the infinity mark.
     
  3. Vick is talking about image on the focusing screen :)
     
  4. Is he?<br><br>Anyway, what 50 mm FLE lens, the CFi or the F/FE?<br>Doesn't matter though, since both should stop at the infinity mark. ;-)
     
  5. What does it look like out there? "Past infinity" I mean. :)
    BTW: the i in CFi, does it stand for "infinity"? :)
     
  6. Ferdi, put the lens cap on your lens, forget to put film in your camera, set a shutterspeed and aperture completely inadequate for the brightness of the scene (and for the imaginary ISO value of the non-existing film), press the shutter release (this is optional, by the way), and you're about half way there creating an impression of what it might look like.
    Next question would, of course, be: how far is it from here to half way towards infinity? (People using hyperfocal distances should be able to give answering that one a fair go. Those answers will be wrong, of course. But still... ;-) )

    The "i" probably is added in reference to the egocentered age we now live in, and thus stands for no more than "i". Demonstrating that Hasselblad feels more affinity towards the Apple-crowd than the less egocentred wii world (as is also evident from their recently advertised Phocus on the iThingies, right?)
     
  7. The "i" probably is added in reference to the egocentered age we now live in, and thus stands for no more than "i". Demonstrating that Hasselblad feels more affinity towards the Apple-crowd than the less egocentred wii world (as is also evident from their recently advertised Phocus on the iThingies, right?)​
    Doesn't Apple's "i" stand for "intelligent"? There was a trend which began in the '90s for i-this (meaning either "intelligent" or "internet-enabled") and e-that (meaning "electronic", or generally computerized). I don't think that these "i"s refer to one's ego.
    I think it may have all begun in the '80s when car manufacturers stuck "i" into their car names to flag the then-advanced idea of fuel injection. So GT became GTi, and so on...Bronica were probably tapping into that zeitgeist when their ETRS and SQA became the ETRSi and SQAi...so Hasselblad had to follow suit!
     
  8. Completely off-topic now, but anyway... ;-)<br>What the "i" may or may not have stood for originally, i don't think Nintendo got it wrong when they countered by calling their machine "we" (though spelled a little bit differently - such that it becomes clear what/who they are referring to in their choice of name.)<br>'Historically', this i-image was hard earned through Apple's insistance that their system should be a closed one. While you could get and make absolutely everything you could think of for the PC-world, everything Apple had to be approved by and sold through the Apple Corporation.<br>Also, it is a bit of a reflection on the people who embraced Apple products as the best thing ever. The same people who insisted on driving red Alfa Romeo's or Lancias, never wore any other sunglasses but Ray Bans, etc.: in short: people who treasured and carefully groomed the image they projected.<br>That all pertains to things happening long before Apple came up with the i-thingies. But though the present i-generation may not have lived through those days, they are not that long ago.<br>It's also a reflection on the consumerist culture all these i-thingies (and those wii thingies too) fit so beautifully in. Personal satisfaction as the highest good. That sort of thing. Apple products (though in no way the first of their kind, or the best of their kind) have become iconic for this. Quite an achievement.<br><br>But to each his own (including view on consumerism, gadgets, and the Apple corporation).<br>;-)<br><br>P.S.<br>To bring this back to the world of photography: is it coincidental (of course it is, but is is fun to consider the possibility that it might not be) that the "i" sound is also so prominent in "Leica"?<br>Also something of a cult, much like the i-thingies.<br>;-)
     

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