500C/M Disassembly question

Discussion in 'Medium Format' started by martinangus, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. I am trying to open up the innards to reveal the gearing so I can clean and lube my 500C/M body.
    I am stuck at the "pin-driver" bolt that is under the advance crank on the side. This needs to come off so I can slide the framework out of the outer case. Do I need a special tool to loosen this bolt? It appears to have two holes and a small shaft on the head. -see photo
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Here is a pic of the fastener in question...
    00adaK-483795584.jpg
     
  3. I feel a neccessity to warn you that "cleaning and lubing" a camera isn't as easy as just removing a few bolts. If I were in your situation, and my camera needed a CLA, I would send it in. That being said, the bolt needs a spanner to remove it. You can get them from micro tools or off of ebay. Here's a link to the page with many of them -- http://www.micro-tools.com/store/~/C-SPN/Spanner-WrenchsLens-Tools.aspx
    Link to a repair manual -- http://www.scribd.com/doc/3005374/Hasselblad-500503-manual-repair
     
  4. You are about to turn a simple CLA from a pro that will likely cost less than $200.00 into a catastrophe that will quite possibly result in your dumping the camera into the nearest trash bin. Do yourself an enormous favor and admit that this is way beyond you and then send it to a reputable Hasselblad repair center.
    Tim
     
  5. You are about to turn a simple CLA from a pro that will likely cost less than $200.00 into a catastrophe that will quite possibly result in your dumping the camera into the nearest trash bin. Do yourself an enormous favor and admit that this is way beyond you and then send it to a reputable Hasselblad repair center.​
    Um, how could you possibly have even the slightest indication as to what is and is not "beyond" me? Do you know me or my capabilities? Geez...all I wanted to know was how to grip this particular bolt and you'd think I was diffusing a nuclear device....chill dudes!
     
  6. Martin-
    The fact that you do not know of the kind of tool needed to remove the "bolt" (it's not a bolt), says plenty about your capabilities.
    What sort of "lube" are you planning on using? I hope it's not 3-in-1 oil or WD-40. Do you know what kind of lubricant to use? It's important. And you're the one who needs to chill-people are trying to help you avoid making an expensive mistake. Be smart- send it to someone who has the tools and knowledge to do it right. It doesn't cost much.
    BTW, it's "defuse", not "diffuse". Somebody goes diffusing a nuclear device, I don't want to be within a thousand miles of it!
     
  7. Um, how could you possibly have even the slightest indication as to what is and is not "beyond" me? Do you know me or my capabilities? Geez...all I wanted to know was how to grip this particular bolt and you'd think I was diffusing a nuclear device....chill dudes!
    The fact that you ask this question betrays your competency. Do what you wish, but try to save all the parts. You have no fixtures nor special tools and gauges or specifications for reassembling the camera.
    Fools rush in where angels fear to tread. Everything looks easy if someone else is doing the work. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Experience is the best teacher, but the most expensive one. You learn from your mistakes, but you make mistakes because you don't know what you're doing - George Washington. Best of all, "A man's gotta' know his limitations."
     
  8. I should have known that just about anything posted in this site somehow turns into a controversy. Andrew, thank you for the only constructive contribution so far. Everyone else, I do thank you for the contribution of fatherly advice. Are all photographers condiscending jerks?
    Over and out.
     
  9. Martin, what others may have failed to communicate is that:
    The Hasselblad cameras require several specialized tools, as well as a very specific jig (that can't readily be improvised) in order to set the film to flange distance after reassembly.
    Failure to use this jig (and have the knowledge and experience to do it properly) results in a camera that will never focus correctly. It is not a setting that can be marked and the body returned to, nor can it be "winged".
    The other major issue is that the cocking assembly requires a jig to set the proper actuation at various angles. Some can do it by eye, but without the jig it may work on one lens and not the other, etc.
    I'm fairly mechanically inclined, and have all the repair manuals and tools as well, but I won't even attempt a hassy body after reading through the manual several times. I'd be happy to send you the pdf files, should you need them.
     
  10. Martin, you have no idea how constructive the other contributions were. Maybe you will after you're done with your DIY CLA.
     
  11. Interestingly, it looks like it has been previously disassembled using improper tools or techniques. It doesn't seem like the OP is making a living from this camera so why not... go for it.
     
  12. Another question: that looks like a late model 500C/M. How badly could it possibly need to be relubed? I bought my 1994 C/M a little over two years ago, and I've already put over 200 rolls though it without a single hiccup to the advance mechanism. Or a single "OMG, my Hassy is jammed!" moment, for that matter. Are you just servicing it so that it has been recently serviced?
    This should be taken as very serious contructive advice: one of my film backs is now out of alignment. It is a much older one (nuts to me for trying to save money), and will not take proper photos. I have never disassembled or dropped it, and it looks completely perfect. It loads correctly, and all the parts seem to be in place. But the film is being held just a hair away from where it is supposed to be, since not a SINGLE photo that I take with this this back is in focus. They're all just slightly off, as if I had a back focusing issue; but nothing in front of or behind the subject is any sharper.
    And unfortunately, I didn't find this out until I had ruined a VERY important photo shoot. Two rolls of colour and two of black and white, all junked; not a single image was suitable for enlargement. Since a 12x12 image on a 16x20 sheet is my standard print, that's kind of a big deal. At least it was personal work. It was a very important personal shoot that circumstances mean I can never, ever reshoot ... but at least it didn't affect my business or my reputation.
    And that is why you shouldn't go mucking around with your Hassy yourself.
     
  13. BOLT removed with split ring pliers, auxilliary shutter lag issue repaired...all fixed and works like a charm.
    Thanks for all the positive support.
     
  14. Sounds like you made out okay then. Glad to hear!
     
  15. Good for you!
     
  16. And now it will end up on fleebay as "Beauteful Hassleblad body, recently and profissionally overhauled/CLAD" for only $1200, body only, no returns.
    Lord have mercy on our souls.
     
  17. I really had no fear about doing the work as the risk was very low. These things sell all day long on ebay for $300 so why send it out for a $200 CLA? Economics force the diy people's hand.
    As much as I respect the blad, the market is wacked when this legendary icon of quality craftsmanship is valued less than a used flash gun!
     
  18. I've had my 500C out of the case after finding the documents explaining how to do it and made some simple adjustments which fixed an issue it had.
    If one has some basic skills and knows and accepts the risks, why not try something like this and get a better understanding of how things work. Too much today society in general is taking the attitude to have someone else fix their problems (as well as their life) and not having the motivation to learn or try something on their own. How many of you with kids have attempted to impart some skills, presuming you have the skills to begin with, such as basic car repair, carpentry, or home repairs which could help them later in life. Then again many kids today seem to lack the interest or motivation to learn things like this and adopt the attitude, "Let somebody else fix it".
    "Why should I develop my own B&W film? I might ruin it"
    Sorry for this little rant, but I do appreciate the fact that Martin had the initiative to undertake something such as this and more so when getting stuck had asked a question how to move forward. Just know your limits and don't attempt home dentistry :)
     
  19. I'm all for repairing as much as you can yourself, however, if you reference the attached jpg of the service manual, you'll note that reassembly needs to be within .03mm of the reference. Not something most people have the tools to measure, much less have the required jigs to do so.
    A misadjusted body will still work, though typically most will blame focusing errors on a bad lens, or misaligned screen. There are many, many easily done repairs, including lens shutters (even in a hassy lens) and lens disassembly/element cleaning if you use care and are attentive to details. Aligning a Hasselblad body, however, isn't one of them. I've done it, when I had access to the proper jigs and tools. Even having the proper jigs and tools it's tricky to get within tolerances.[​IMG]
     
  20. A bit of perspective: the focal length mentioned in the copied part of the manual above is that of the inner chassis, which is made up of a number separate parts. The thing they call "the camera" in that text is not the camera as we understand it.<br>When assembled from those parts, the focal length of that assembly is adjusted - absolutely needs to be adjusted - using that rig.<br>While it is of course so that it is/should be checked once more when that assembly is then put inside the shell, just removing it from and putting it back into the shell to work on the parts mounted on that chassis does very little to mess up the focal length of this thing.<br><br>So though certainly depending on how you treat that inner assembly, and though it certainly is a good idea to have something tackle this who has the knowledge and tools to do the job properly, it still is very well possible to remove the thing from the shell and put it back into it without messing things up.<br>Whether you have messed things up can be checked without a jig, by testing the thingy running film through the camera. It will not be as easy and quick to adjust the thing - if needed - using this method. And you will have to know how to do that.<br>And it doesn't take god-like powers. A bit of common and 'mechanical' sense and a fair deal of manual dexterity will go a very long way.<br>So yes, given the cost of professional repair and what these cameras are worth in the market, i wouldn't think it a bad idea to have a go yourself.<br><br>Having said all that, i'll repeat that it still is a good idea to have something tackle this who has the knowledge and tools to do the job properly. But it's not the one and only way to fix something and do that well.
     
  21. Check that the mirror pre-release is working, sometimes it is tricky to get this straight when reassembling the body.
     
  22. Tell me about it...LOL I must have opened and closed the body up a dozen times!!!
     

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