35mm Summicron ASPH

Discussion in 'Leica and Rangefinders' started by alan_stokes, Jul 23, 1999.

  1. I have recently purchased a 35mm Summicron ASPH and I am wondering if anyone has any comments about this new lens from a users point of view.From what I have read so far the new lens seems to be superior at full aperture.
    Regards Alan Stokes
     
  2. I've used two previous versions of the Summicron, along with several
    examples of the Nikkor 35/2.0. None of them have come close to the
    Summicron ASPH, especially wide open (well maybe the previous
    non-ASPH 'cron did, but only stopped down to 4.0 or better).

    <p>

    The tonal quality of this lens is amazing - the subtlety of the
    shadings it renders is breathtaking. I find the images have a very
    "solid" feel to them, somehow. It's also very flare-resistant, making
    it a joy to shoot contre-jour.

    <p>

    One of the shots I have that best illustrates its wide-aperture
    qualities is a snap of my parents on Christmas morning two years ago.
    Shot on Fuji 800 neg, wide open at 1/60 - the image is pin-sharp. My
    Nikkors couldn't do that well at f/4, frankly.

    <p>

    All in all, the best and most useful lens I own. Can you tell I love
    it?
     
  3. Please go to this site for one of the most complete reviews written.
    It convinced me and I'm not
    sorry :http://www.imx.nl/photosite/leica/leicahome.html
     
  4. Great photos I have been taking on it - although I can't really compare it with others - I haven't taken serious photos for many years - since before autofocus days!

    <p>

    Most of my shots are natural light wide open using 400 to 3200 ASA and so far I do see flare in the lens sometimes.

    <p>

    One pic I took on Millennium eve on the roof top of Westin Bangkok directly into the red airplane roof lights showed huge flare. Is this because of the intense red colour of the lights? I was about 10 feet away.

    <p>

    Another comment I have is that there are only 8 blades in the iris and when stopped down to 2.8 or 4 at night into bright lights, the shape of the light spots are not natural - there are spokes coming out of the lights. Some of the older Leitz lenses built in the 70s have very beautiful 10-12 blade (I think) circular irises and thus maintain better light shapes when stopped down.

    <p>

    Nevertheless, when the above 2 considerations are not in play, the lense wide open is truely great. I don't see any reason why you have to use any other aperture!
     
  5. I use the Summilux ASPH (the f/1.4 version) and agree wholeheartedly
    with the above comments. It's said (by Erwin Puts, among others) that
    the f/2 has somewhat more even performance across the field while the
    f/1.4 is a tad better at the center. I agree with Paul that it blows
    the Nikkor 35/2 into the weeds at wide apertures - and the Nikkor is
    not a shabby lens by any standard. So the advice is to shoot it wide on
    slow film. You'll be amazed by what these lenses can do handheld. I
    have 20X24 enlargenents from kodachome 64 and velvia slides that were
    shot offhand in available light. They look like they were shot with a
    645 on a tripod.

    <p>

    Alexey
     
  6. Well, I've been using the 35/1.4 asph for about a month or so now,
    and I have to say that it's simply the best lens I've used. The
    quality of the results is astounding and far beyond what the R series
    35/2 (or even 50/2, in my opinion) can achieve, which used to be my
    favourite lens. It really makes me wonder about the quality of the
    other asph offerings for the M series and whether I shouldn't just go
    over to M. With a "miniature" format like 35 mm, lenses which are at
    (or approach) their best wide open are a dream come true, especially
    for documentary photography.
     
  7. Robert

    <p>

    I think your comments about the new Leica ASPH and Apo lenses is
    quite true, but it syas nothing about the relative merits of R over M
    lenses - just the merits of the latest Leica designs. The new
    Summilux-R 50mm and the 180mm Tele Elmarit-R Apo are probably the
    best lenses of these focal length in the world bar none and for many
    years the 100mm Macro-Elmarit-R was acknowledged to be the "best"
    performing Leica lens. The new 90mm Summicron-M may now be even
    better...The point is is that the new crop (late 1990s) of lenses
    that are coming out now for both M and R are simply amazing I just
    wish I could afford them!
     
  8. Leica 35mm 1.4 ASPH is considered as the best 35mm of all time from
    most of French magazines such as "Chasseur D'Images". The optical
    test results are amazing. It is said it is as best as 35mm F2 at full
    aperture. I bought it and well, I have nothing to say ! All ASPH
    lenses are the new version of the Leica firm, ans they are said to be
    the best right now. I used to own an EOS 3...and sold it. Regards.
     

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