126 Film Cartridges Modified for 35mm

Discussion in 'Film and Processing' started by bruce_varner|2, Sep 8, 2015.

  1. I need to know if there is anyone who sells 126 film cartridges that have already been modified to accept 35mm film?

    I am sure this has been beat around, but I believe my question is slightly different.... I have seen and followed the directions found on the net, which state to obtain a 126 cartridge and twist it until it breaks the plastic welds holding it together. I have spent the money on two different 126 film cartridges now & broken both, attempting to "break the weld" on the cartridge. It is getting expensive enough now that it would be cheaper in the long run for me to buy one already "modified" for this purpose.

    I did find one person who had one cartridge left on eBay that was already modified. I purchased it before I knew enough to understand that the camera determines the film speed from a notch in the 126 cartridge. As would be the case, the cartridge I obtained was a 64 ASA/ISO speed cartridge. I understand that I can compensate, but to me that is a poor way to go.....

    I really want 2 cartridges: 1-100 ASA/ISO & 1-400 ASA/ISO.

    I guess it would be possible to modify a cartridge of some other film speed, but like the "instructions" I have already found in the first place, everyone spends several minutes explaining how to reload the already modified cartridge with 35mm film & only two seconds on how to modify the cartridge in the first place. I have reloaded the modified cartridge I already have and that is the easy part.....

    So can someone direct me to anyone who does this type of modification? Thanks!
    Camera: Kodak Instamatic 500
     
  2. I cut mine open carefully with a razor blade. (plus some twisting and popping)
    Patience and finesse is the key.
    Instamatic cameras are not as sophisticated as you may think. Those speed-sensing tabs don't really do much in most cameras. Probably only selecting between two different shutter speeds.
    Best to stick with ISO 100 film and use its latitude to your advantage.
     
  3. I did the same as Bill did. I used an Xacto knife and took my time. As for the speeds I used to shoot Ektachrome 64 in a simple 126 camera and 99% of the slides were projectable. The tabs were really more like 100 and 400.
     
  4. i HAVE A FEW 126 CAMERAS INCLUDING A YASHICA EZ-MATIC ELECTRONIC.
    FREE TO EITHER A GOOD OR BAD HOME.
    IT WORKED WITH ASA 64 PRINT FILM BUT NEVER WITH SLIDE FILM.
    THE PROBLEMS i SEE WERE NOT MENTIONED.
    1- THE IMAGE IS 26.5 MM AND 35 MM FILM LIKELY WILL SHOW A FEW
    EDGES OF SPROCKET HOLKES.
    2- THE SINGLE - PER FRAME- OF 126 IS BAFFLED BU THE MANY SPROPCKET HOLES OF 35MM FILM.
    YOY CANOT TAPE BACK THE PRONG AS IT OFTEN COCKS THE SHUTTER.
    AND ONE WAY IS TO BLOCK THE LENS AND MAKE SEVERAL BLOCKED EXPOSURES 6? TO ADVANCE TO THE NEXT FRAME.
    ( no light leaks) this could serve to advance the film enough to elinate frame overlap.
    if you could advance and also cock the shutter another means to count would be required.
    I would suggest the tip of a ty-rap causing a click as each sprocket hole is passed.
    the paper hole would be blocked. and more than 20 exp could be available.
    exposure. asa 64 or most slow film is no longer made.
    fuji has asa /iso 50 color slide film.
    with B&W iso 100 film can be dveloped as iso 5. or just use normal development and let film latitude work.
    if I were serious about this I would use iso 400 and develop it as iso 200 or let film latitude take over.
    If it used flash cububes, I would avoid taking flash photos.
    all in all you can go for it if you wish.
    a small 35mm P&S uses easy ( for now) film and is easier handling.
    If you had something like and instamatic 500 eith a real lens and sutter.
    you could get some fine photos.
    but most-- the overwealming majority--- of 126 cameras were pretty mickey mouse.
    they were really BOX CAMERAS with plastic lenses.
    I have several 127 cameras, a 8 exp with a curved film plane.
    and two 127 16 exp " mini0caqndid: camwras that have a fklat plane.
    I consider a ty wrap top will give me clicks. a 35mm spool- no cart. fits in the supply recess. and the edge sproket holes will not intrude too far. the film path is flat and it should be lots of fun.
    at least less complicated than using a 126
    now my 16mm cameras-forget it.
     
  5. The early cartridges were notched for ISO 64 and ISO 160. The better quality 126 cameras could exploit those settings. Later cartridges probably offered more ISO speeds (maybe up to 400 to accommodate Tri-X) but I don't know how many cameras could use the additional settings. The Instamatic 500 was one of the best, from what I've read.
     
  6. Bill & Larry,
    Thanks! I was able to successfully pop open a cartridge finally. The Exacto knife helped.
    Walter,
    Thanks! The problems you mention are known. I do have an Instamatic 500 & that is why the effort to create a workable solution. I now have a usable cartridge in ASA 100 and am in the process of exposing my first roll. I will report back with results when completed.
    Mike,
    As I understand it, all 126 cartridges are notched between ASA 64 & ASA 400. Not sure about which models actually use the notch? Seems to me that they all would because there are several stops difference between 64 & 400……. I do know that my 500 does have a sensor.
    By the way, there must not have been many 500’s produced. I have searched the internet and am unable to find the user manual for this Kodak model in either print or digital format. If anyone knows where to find either the user manual or a repair manual for the Kodak Instamatic 500, please let me know. It is a rather straight forward camera, but it would still be nice to see what is in the manual?????
    Thanks!
     
  7. I,have a Kodak,500 and it works great but I don't have a manual,or guide either. But the camera takes great pictures - for
    an Instamatic :)
     
  8. Maybe this will help you with the notching.
    http://kodak.3106.net/index.php?p=509
     
  9. Larry,
    Yes I have seen that page. I seem to recall that before I became really interested in this topic, to have seen somewhere, actual dimensions, the size/depth of the different notches that determine the film speed for the camera. Cannot find it now........... Has anyone ever actually seen a cartridge for 400 speed film? I haven't.
    Bill,
    I have found a couple of people mention on Flickr that they have a manual but as of yet I have not figured out Flickr enough to send them a message....
     
  10. I believe there was TX-126, but it might have been an SO. As well as I know, the notch is on a continuous scale. (It seems that 110 has a two position notch system.)
    That is, there is a sliding tab that falls in the notch, and its position adjusts the exposure for cameras that use it.
    I think the 500 does, but I am more sure on the 7xx and 8xx. About 1985, I took a 714 on a backpack trip that I didn't want to bring a regular camera, or maybe along with it. Also around that time, I had a roll of KX-126 in a 134 that I took on a canoe trip. I wanted one cheap enough that I wouldn't worry if it fell in the water. That might have been close to the end for 126 slide film.
     
  11. I have several 126 Cartridges of Kodacolor Gold, ASA 200, that expired in 1996. I have heard that Kodacolor Gold holds up pretty well so I was anxious to shoot a roll. I loaded it into a Minolta Autopak 700, closed the back door and the exposure needle which was working a few seconds earlier, refused to react to the light. So I took it out and put in an empty cartridge and the exposure needle worked fine. In comparing the two cartridges I noticed that the "fresh" cartridge, (the 1996 cartridge), did not have a notch at all. This is the first cartridge I have come across with no film speed notches at all. So I cut a notch in the frame of the cartridge in the same position as another, older, Kodacolor Gold 200 using an X-acto knife, put the cartridge back in the camera, and the exposure needle worked fine. So I guess for that particular camera at least the notches are necessary for the automatic exposure and or the metering to work. I have several empty cartridges notched for speeds of 64, 100, 125, and 200 and each one gives a different reading on the Minolta's meter so the notches must be somewhat important. When I load 35mm film a 126 cartridge, I try to match the film speed to a matching cartridge. I don't have a 400 cartridge so if I shoot with ASA 400 film I will put it into a 200 cartridge and change the f stop manually. Has anyone else run across the 126 cartridges with no notches? Thanks!
     
  12. Yes, some were sold without notches. I believe that many of the later 126 cameras did not compensate for film speed. I also believe that in the later years of the 126, the film speeds produced were much more limited. In that case the manufacturer would have expected the camera to "just work" with the film provided. Someone correct me if I am wrong. Did the packaging on the film say which cameras it was made for?
    Much good information on this subject at: http://kodak.3106.net/index.php?p=207
     
  13. No, the film packaging did not mention any particular camera. I have a Kodak Instamatic 100 with no adjustments and perhaps it would be interesting to shoot a roll of film in that camera and see how it does. However, I prefer using the Minolta 700 or a Kodak Instamatic 500 because of their better lenses and adjustable settings. It was no big deal to cut the notch in the cartridge. Thanks for the link.
     
  14. I just started to modify and use 110 cartridges It was the analog idea for DX I think. and Kodak had those little things in a few flavors including Kodachrome 64. as I shot 110 slides. I do dink that in the latter days of 126 that it did not matter much as most who were still using them were using simple cameras. Cut the tabs in off or leave on. With the Great SLR 126 cameras you adjusted the meter with a knob not the taps. In the latter days. I think it did not matter who or what film was in or what tabs as no one cared. Last 126 film and the cartage was made in Italy same films were sold 200 and 400 I have one of each and same tabs.
     

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